iMovie Tips

128Get Your Touch On
Apple may not feel that touchscreen computers are in its future, but they aren’t shy about adding multitouch gestures to their desktop apps for laptop users and those of us rocking a Magic Trackpad. iMovie ’11 is no exception, and features a trio of such gestures.

The first multitouch tip enables adding new media to your Project, which is done by first selecting a clip (or portion of a clip) in the Event browser and then using three fingers to swipe up on the trackpad. Just like magic, your selection is now added to the end of your project.

The second gesture allows you to expand or contract filmstrips by moving the pointer over the Event or Project browser and pinching two fingers closed to contract or pinching two fingers open to expand — a gesture that should be very familiar to users of the company’s iOS devices.

Finally, if you want to move a clip within your project to either the left or right of the clip next to it, simply select the desired clip and then swipe left or right with three fingers accordingly. Let’s see iMovie’s big brother, Final Cut Pro, do that!

Import Movies Directly from Your iPhone
Although the new desktop version of iMovie ’11 is sadly lacking in any interoperability with the stripped-down iOS version, there is one welcome iPhone-related change from iMovie ’09 — you can now plug in your iPhone and iMovie will recognize it and offer to import any movies in your Camera Roll.

This newfound ability might not have been such a big deal in the iPhone 3GS days with its low-resolution SD camera, but it’s now a must-have for the iPhone 4’s 720p HD video — especially for more ambitious projects that go beyond the scope of the mobile version of iMovie. (Note that import will also work on the 3GS, for those of you still rockin’ last year’s handset.)

Analyze This
iMovie ’09 added a very welcome Stabilization function to the program’s bag of tricks in order to help smooth out jumpy or handheld footage. That function first required a clip to be analyzed in order to perform its magic, which could be a lengthy process for longer pieces of video.

Now that Apple has added the People Finder feature to iMovie ’11, you’ll be happy to know that you can analyze clips for both Stabilization and People in one fell swoop — along with the option to do only Stabilization or only People.

Clips that have already been analyzed for Stabilization can also now be marked for camera pans, noting when the camera moves left or right. Choose File > Analyze Video > Mark Camera Pans and now video with camera pans will be indicated with a blue line across the top of the clip, and you can even filter for those type of actions when your editing calls for it.

Viewing Your Timeline In A More Traditional Way

When iMovie ’08 was first released in mid-2007, many of us who were used to more traditional ways of editing were stymied by the way projects were now viewed in a stacked ribbon — since the dawn of non-linear editing, timelines have mostly been viewed as one seemingly endless horizontal strip. Someone at Apple must have taken note of the fact that we still haven’t quite adjusted to it three years later, so now you can take matters into your own hands.

First navigate to iMovie>Preferences and turn on Show Advanced Tools under the General tab.

In the upper right corner of the Project window, you’ll now find a new Horizontal Display button to the left of the chapter mark tool. With a stacked view in your Project, click the Horizontal Display button and you’ll now see a nice clean, all-horizontal view of your project as you edit. Click it again to go back to the classic stacked view, but only if you must!

Making iMovie ’11 More Like Final Cut

These tips aren’t new to iMovie ’11, but f you want the program to look more like the traditional view of higher-end apps like Final Cut Pro.

Switch the timeline to the bottom of the screen and your unedited media to the top by selecting Window > Swap Events and Projects (or click the Swap button positioned between the windows, to the right of the Import button). After a fancy animated switcheroo, your Event Library and media now appear at the top of the display and your timeline resides at the bottom, a view that will likely be more comfortable to seasoned editors.

The horizontal timeline view and window swap tips work best If you also happen to have a second display attached to your computer. In iMovie ’11, you can select Window > Viewer on Other Display and move your view of the edited project to its own screen, giving you the entire top (or bottom) of the iMovie display to see your newly emancipated Project timeline — and have a swanky editing setup just like the pros use.

Title Duplicate
If you spend a lot of time creating videos with iMovie, you’ll certainly appreciate some of the new version’s little niceties, many of which have been moved from the Edit menu and grouped into a new Clip menu along with the new one-step effects.

For instance, how many times have you created a project with a number of similar title cards, spending valuable time having to add a stock title each time and then editing it to match the length and font style of your previous one? Now all you need to do is select a clip (or range of frames) and choose Clip > Duplicate Last Title, edit the text to suit you and move on.

Inspecting Your Inspector
With your iMovie Preferences set up to edit a clip when you double-click on it (rather than Play the clip), the clip Inspector is always available quickly, same as in the previous iMovie ’09. But there are some cool new functions tucked away there that you may have overlooked.
In addition to now changing the speed of a clip without having to convert it first (by moving the slider or typing the speed you want as a percentage), you can now reverse it with a single click, a nifty tool which has been available on more sophisticated non-linear editors for some time.

iMovie ’11 also adds a new Rolling Shutter option which helps to cut down on wobbly or skewed video caused by the CMOS image sensor still prevalent on most consumer camcorders. Click on “Reduce motion distortion” to enable it for a clip and after your video is analyzed, use the pulldown to select an amount from None to Extra High. Apple recommends High or Extra High for footage shot with a Flip camcorder or a mobile phone that records video, which presumably includes the iPhone 4. (It did indeed look better in our quick, unscientific tests.)

Equalize Your iLife
Audio is a big focus of iMovie ’11, with most of the spotlight on the slick new audio waveform mode to adjust levels and see color-coded warnings where the sound might be too overpowering. But Apple has also beefed up audio options in the Inspector as well, including a new Equalizer.

Open the clip in question, select the Audio tab on the Inspector and you’ll see the new Equalizer function, which you can customize entirely on your own or pick from one of nine presets, including Voice Enhance, Music Enhance and Hum Reduction, which should help tame less than dynamic audio recordings and keep annoying electrical line hums at bay.

Apple’s engineers didn’t stop there, also adding an audio Enhance mode — click on “Reduce background noise by” and adjust the slider, then listen to the results. We tried it on some clips recorded near a busy highway and it worked quite well, bringing down the unwanted background noise and making people speaking in the foreground that much more audible.

Audio Effects

While iMovie ’09 had some very capable video effects, this year’s release adds an equal number of audio effects to spice up most any production.

To get to the audio effects, select a clip. Click on the Inspector button or go to Window>Clip Adjustment in the Menu Bar.

Click on Audio Effect in the Clip tab.

In addition to specialized effects such as Robot, Cosmic and Telephone, you also have the ability to add Echo, four sizes of Room Echo and four variations of Pitch Down or Pitch Up.

Integrate with Facebook

Thanks to the updated iPhoto, the whole iLife ’11 benefits from deeper integration with the social network everyone loves to hate, Facebook. That integration also carries over to iMovie, where you can now choose from your online Facebook photos to import into a project, as well as the traditional iPhoto and PhotoBooth options.

Keep in mind that you’ll first need to open iPhoto ’11 and let the program sync with Facebook, which will then carry those photo albums into your iLife Media Browser and make them available to all supported programs.

Contextual Menus
Apple hasn’t forgotten about the ever-handy contextual menus in iMovie ’11; functions such as Loop Selection and the ability to both Analyze and Optimize clips have been added to adjust clips within a Project, as well as the aforementioned new Duplicate Last Title and options to Arrange Music Tracks and select your Project Theme.

Event browser clips can also now be looped or have their video analyzed — for Stabilization and People, Stabilization only, People only to to Mark Camera Pans. There is also the ability to Split Event Before Clip as well as the same shortcut to make adjustments to your Project Theme.

In addition to the contextual menus we’ve all come to love and depend on, you can launch the Inspector directly from a clip and put iMovie ’11 in Precision editor Mode by clicking on the gear that appears when you hover over a clip.

Storyboard Like a Pro
iMovie ’11 is touting a Movie Trailers mode, giving you the ability to create short, Hollywood-style previews with just a few clicks. But you can also use the animatics provided by the Movie Trailers feature to rough out your own project, and then swap them out for footage you shoot later.

Go to Window > Maps, Backgrounds and Animatics (which used to be called just Maps & Backgrounds) and scroll down to find 16 animatics, which are essentially motion-enabled dummy clips for various camera angles, such as Closeup, Medium, Wide, Landscape and Animal.

iMovie ’11 provides a mix of clips for males or females — simply drag & drop one of them to your timeline and you’ll have a filler clip that can later be replaced with a real clip by dragging the new clip onto the animatic. Release your mouse button and click Replace, and the job is done. Animatics are a great way to organize your thoughts and plan for footage you haven’t had time to shoot, but still be able to see if your concept fits into your work-in-progress.

iPhoto Tips

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iPhoto lets you do more than you ever thought possible with your photos, with easy ways to find, sort, and rediscover your favorite shots. Simple but powerful editing tools let you turn good photos into magnificent ones. Share directly to Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and Messages. iPhoto also works with iCloud, so the photos you take on your iOS devices automatically appear in iPhoto, and you can share selected photos and videos with family and friends using iCloud Photo Sharing. You can even create professional-quality photo books, calendars and letterpress cards quickly and easily.


1. Full Screen Image Editing


Click images to embiggen

Use this feature to remove the clutter of the Desktop, Menu Bar, Dock and other photos by editing a photo in Full Screen mode.

To enter full screen editing mode, you have three options:

Option #1: Select a photo to edit. in the Menu Bar select View > Full Screen and your photo will grow to fill the screen. You have access to the photo slider when you mouse over the top of the screen, and when you mouse over the bottom of the screen you will gain access to the edit menu. Press the Escape key to return.

Option #2: Select a photo to edit. Right-click and select, “Edit Using Full Screen.”

Option #3: You can set iPhoto to automatically open all photos you want to edit in Full Screen mode. To do this, in the Menu Bar select iPhoto > Preferences (or press Command + comma). Select the General tab and select “Using Full Screen” from the Edit Photo drop-down menu.

2. Creating and Using Multiple Libraries
When you’re dealing with large amounts of photos, it may be necessary to create multiple libraries to handle all of your photos. This can also be handy if you wanted to separate family photos from photos you might take for work.

To create a new library, hold down the Option key while opening iPhoto. A new dialog will popup asking if you want to choose another library, create a new library, or choose another library (including the default) that iPhoto already knows about. Click Create New and specify a name and save location in the box that drops down. iPhoto will now load and display the new library. To switch libraries, hold down the Option key on startup and click the Other Library button, navigate to the other library, then select Open.

3. Step Through Effects
When editing photos, iPhoto provides several effects that can spice up your collection. These effects include Black and White, Antique, Edge Blurs and others. You can apply the effects by selecting the Effects button at the bottom of the edit panel. To apply multiple effects, just click on the effects you want applied. But what if you want to step back through, or reduce the intensity of the effect, without losing the other effects.

Most effects will give you a number representing the level of the effect you have applied to your photo; to move backwards, hold down the option key while clicking the effect. The number will decrease, decreasing the effect level in your photo.

4. Edit Images side-by-side
Editing images can be improved when you can see multiple pictures side-by-side. iPhoto will greatly oblige, too. To open multiple pictures in edit mode, simply select two or more photos in an album and then select the edit button in the bottom toolbar.

The resulting edit window will display the three photos. The photo framed by the white box is the photo that you’re currently editing. You can move between the photos you’re editing by clicking the other photos. You are able to add up to eight images to the edit mode window.

5. Add Location Information Manually

Photos taken with your iPhone, a GPS-enabled camera or an Eye-Fi Card may contain location information about where your pictures were taken; however, if you have a camera without GPS functionality, this particular metadata will be missing from your photos.

There are three ways to add this information manually: by album/event, by photo, or by multiple photos. When you mouse over the lower-right corner of an event, album, or photo you’ll notice a small i. Clicking this will result in a popup panel that will allow you to specify metadata information like location. Type in a city in the location field and iPhoto will search to find your location. When you’re finished, select Done to save. You can select multiple photos, albums or events to change the location.

6. Use Time Machine to Bring Back Deleted Photos

Ever get that sinking feeling that you’ve deleted some important data on your computer? If you have Time Machine enabled, you can at least restore your important data, including photos, albums, events, and more from iPhoto.

To look for deleted items in iPhoto, simply open the iPhoto application and launch Time Machine from the menu bar or dock. When you do, iPhoto will open up in the Time Machine interface, letting you search for deleted items. Click an item and select Restore to restore it to your current iPhoto library.

7. Add Borders, Backgrounds, and Change Layout When Printing 

You can instantly jazz up your photos when printing by adding borders and backgrounds when printing your photos.

To do this, select the photos you wish to print, and in the Menu Bar select File > Print, then in the resulting drop-down menu select Customize.

A new view will appear with your photo in the center. The new bottom toolbar will let you add a theme to the photos, enabling you to print a matte around your photo. You can also change the background color, border, and layout. When you’re done editing your photos for printing, select the Print button in the lower-right corner.

8. Confirm Multiple Faces at Once

Faces is a great way to instantly see every photo taken of a particular person in your iPhoto library, but it’s a pain to train the facial recognition engine. Luckily, there’s a way to confirm multiple Faces at once. To do this, simply navigate to the person in Faces you want to confirm pictures of, then in the area labeled “Person may also be the photos below,” drag a box around the photos you want to confirm. Then, select the Confirm Name button in the bottom toolbar.

9. Include Location Information in Exported Pictures
Want to put your photos on Flickr, Facebook, or just send them to firends or family, but want to include the location of where the photos were taken? This is easy to do in iPhoto with the export options. Just select the photos you wish to share, then select File > Export. In the resulting window, ensure File Export is selected, then check the box Location Information in the Include section. When you press the Export information, the exported file metadata will include location information.

10. Change Key Photo in Album
In iPhoto, you can change the photo that represents an event in the Events listing. This photo is called the key photo, and it’s very easy to set. When mousing over events, you may notice a photo that represents the event more specificaly than the one iPhoto automatically picks. To change it to the one your mouse is hovered over, press the space bar. When you remove your cursor, you’ll notice that the key photo for the event has changed. Additionally, you can do this when inside of an Event by selecting a photo and navigating to Events > Make Key Photo in the Menu Bar, or right-clicking on a photo and selecting Make Key Photo.

11. Merge Events

Sometimes, event photos split up during import because of the date contained in the metadata. To merge two or more events in iPhoto, hold down shift and select the events that go together, then right-click and select “Merge Events.” You can also drag one album into the other.

12. Set up an External Photo Editor
Sometimes you may want to edit your photos with more powerful editing tools than iPhoto can provide. iPhoto can oblige by letting you set up an external editor. This means that when you click the edit button in iPhoto, it will launch the photo in another application, like Adobe Photoshop for instance.

To do this, head to iPhoto > Preferences (or press Command + comma). In the General Tab, under Edit Photo, there are three options: Edit in Main Window, Edit Using Full Screen, and Edit in Another Application. We’ll choose Edit in Application. A dialog window willpop up to prompt you for the application of your choice; navigate to the application and select Open.

13. Share on Facebook, Flickr, and MobileMe

Sharing photos with iPhoto ’09 is a snap. The application lets you share photos with MobileMe, Facebook, or Flickr.

To share your album with MobileMe, select an album, event, or a group of pictures, then select MobileMe to the right of the bottom toolbar. If you are already signed into MobileMe, a window will prompt you to select your sharing options. You can choose who the album is viewable by, whether they can download a few photos or the entire album or upload their own photos through a web browser, and allow people to add photos to the album via email.

Optionally, you can show the photo titles. If you click the Show Advanced button you’ll get two new options: the ability to hide the album on your MobileMe gallery page, and the ability to adjust download quality (if you have downloading enabled). Once you select the settings you want, press Publish. When iPhoto is finished uploading the photos, you’ll get a notification with a link to view the photos in your MobileMe gallery.

Sharing with Facebook is similar. Select the photos you want, then select the Facebook button in the bottom toolbar. You may be prompted to sign in with Facebook and allow iPhoto to post pictures to your account. Once you do that, publishing is a snap. Simply select the security of your album and press the Publish button in the resulting window.

The best thing about using Facebook to share your photos is that if you have someone tagged in a photo, that information will get published, too. And if someone tags something on Facebook, the information will synced with your Mac when you fire up iPhoto again.

To publish your photos to Flickr, select your photos, then select the Flickr button in the bottom toolbar. Once you sign in, you can select the security of the photos (i.e. viewable by only you, your friends, your family, or anyone) and the photo size. When you press Publish, your photos will be whisked away to Flickr.

When you publish your photos to any of the services, you’ll get new albums in the sidebar with the service name. The albums contain the photos you’ve published and if you ever want to add more photos to a published album, all you have to do is simply drag more photos to the album under each service.

14. Using Photo Feeds
A Photo Feed is an RSS feed for your photos. Many services such as Flickr and MobileMe Gallery give you a Photo Feed. iPhoto allows you to subscribe to these photo feeds, and just like an RSS feed, will download the latest photos from your friends and family right to an iPhoto library.

You can manually enter a photo feed address by going to File > Subscribe to Photo Feed (or by pressing Command + U) in the Menu Bar. You can subscribe to a Photo Feed by also going to a MobileMe gallery, opening a album, and clicking the Subscribe button in the toolbar. The result will be a drop-down asking if you wish to subscribe by RSS or open in iPhoto. Selecting iPhoto will check and download the photos in a Subscriptions section.

15. Copy/Paste Locations Among Multiple Photos

Adding location information to photos can be a pain as described above. If you want to shorten the time it takes to add location information to photos, then why not copy and paste the location amongst multiple photos?

To do this, simply press Command + C (or right-click Copy) on any photo containing a location. Then, select multiple photos needing the same location information and right-click. You’ll notice a new option: Paste location. Selecting it will do just that. Simple, but powerful, eh?

16. Delete Photo from Album and Library Simultaneously

If you wish to delete a photo from both an iPhoto album and the main library at the same time, try hold down Command + Option then pressing Delete. The photo will then go straight to the Trash.

17. Export Slideshows to iTunes for Syncing to iPhone/iPod
iPhoto slideshows are a really great way to show off your photos. Too bad they live only in iPhoto. Well, they do until you export them. With iPhoto ’09, you can export any slideshow to iTunes for syncing to an iPhone, iPod, or Apple TV, complete with music and themes.

To create a slideshow, select an album, event, or multiple photos and click the Slideshow button in the bottom toolbar. Select the music options and theme by mousing over the bottom of the screen and selecting the settings button. Once you’ve configured the slideshow, exit by pressing the ESC key on your keyboard. Then, go to File > Export and select the Slideshow tab. Check the boxes next to the platforms you want the video to play on (iPod, iPhone, Apple TV, Computer, etc.), then check the box labeled Automatically send slideshow to iTunes. When you’re ready to export, click the Export button.

18. Using Star Ratings with Smart Album

A great way to sort your photos in iPhoto is to use star ratings with Smart Albums. Every photo, album, or event can be given a star rating. To do this, right click on the photo and select Get Info. From the resulting view, give it a star rating by clicking the small bubbles below the photo date. When you’re finished, click Done.

To view photos with a certain star rating, in the Menu Bar select File > New Smart Album. In the resulting drop-down menu, select My Rating from the first drop-down list, then select “is” from the second drop down, then in the third box select how ever many stars you wish to view. Give your new album a name at the top, then click OK. Your new album will contain photos rated only with the rating you specified. As you rate more photos, the smart album will be updated automatically.

19. Using Keywords

Using keywords is another great way to sort your photos. Keywords allows you to narrow down searches in iPhoto and allows you to keep track of what’s going on with your albums. To use keywords, point your cursor over to the Menu Bar, and select Window > Show Keywords. A new window will open with several predefined keywords such as “Birthday, Family, Favorite, etc.” To add a keyword, select a photo, or photos, in iPhoto, then click on any of the keywords. They will be added to the photo. You can also add your own by selecting Edit Keywords and even add shortcuts for adding certain keywords.

You can search through your photos by keyword by clicking the small search button next to the search field at the bottom of the iPhoto window. This will allow you to select keyword and consecutively narrow your search by keywords.

20. Hide Photos

Hiding photos is great when you want to show off your iPhoto collection to someone, but don’t want them to see certain photos (don’t worry, we won’t judge you). To hide a photo or group of photos, select them in your library and right-click to select “Hide Photo.”

When you want to show your photos again, in the Menu Bar select View > Hidden Photos at which point you can right-click the hidden photo and select “Unhide Photo.”

GarageBand Tips

icon256The new GarageBand features are impressive. You can fix your guitarist’s inability to keep a beat. You can extend that final note of your song. You can even keep track of your progress as you learn the guitar or keyboards.

But before you get the guitar, keyboards or mics out, it’s actually helpful if you know how to use some of the big ticket items without fumbling around for hours. We even highlighted a few little known features to help round out your GarageBand knowledge.

Set up Your Info

By default, GarageBand uses your account information on your Mac as your artist name. Before you start working on your tunes, it’s probably a good idea to change this information.

GarageBand>Preferences under the My Info tab. Change it or you’ll end up like me with a lame Artist name.


Turn off your Screensaver

It seems like a no brainer, but when you have your guitar all hooked up and ready to rock, the last thing you need is your Hello Kitty screen saver popping up right before you strum that first note.

Head to System Preferences > Desktop & Screen Saver and turn it off.

Record with Multiple Devices

Apple tells you that you can now record multiple tracks at once. You plug your guitars in and nothing happens. Here’s what you need to do to get the band back together.

You’re going to create an Aggregate Device. This will alow you to have multiple devices plugged in to your Mac and have GarageBand recognize them individually instead of just one input.

Head on over to Utilities/Audio MIDI Setup. Navigate to the Menu Bar Window>Audio Devices.

Plug in all your fancy musical instruments.

Click on the + symbol in the Audio Devices window. Clcik on Aggregate Devices on your new item and give a name. We chose Geetars for our bass and electric guitars.

Your instruments and how they are connected to your Mac should show up on the right hand side of the Audio Devices window. Check the Use box next to the connections of your instruments. We utilized the Built-in Input for the guitar and an XLR to USB converter called the CEntrance MicPort Pro for our bass.

Launch GarageBand and head on over to GarageBand>Preferences. Click on the Audio/MIDI tab and select your new Audio Input device.

Head up to the Menu Bar and select Track > Enable Multitrack Recording.

In your project, create Real Instrument tracks for your instruments. Don’t bother with Electric Guitar track, it won’t work.

Select each track and click on the i in the lower right hand corner. From there you can select the Input Source for each track.

You can connect up to eight instruments like this. That’s half of the Arcade Fire connected to one Mac.

Write Your Lyrics in GarageBand with Notes

While you’re recording your awesome new single, you can finally have your lyrics right in front of you on the screen instead of scribbled on that Taco Bell napkin or in another application that stops you from interfacing with GarageBand. Just head on over to the Menu Bar and select Window>Notepad.

Smaller GarageBand Project Files

If you’re sharing your project files with band mates over the Internet, sending the larger files can be a huge pain. Thankfully Apple has used some magical Pixies’ dust and made those files smaller.

New artist lessons include Tom Sawyer by Rush and Soul Meets Body by Death Cab for Cutie

Whether you’re into Prog rock or Indie, you should be happy with the new lessons available in GarageBand. Apple says we can expect more. Hopefully they’re right, and hopefully one of them is Prince. Seriously, how rad would it be to have Prince teach you Purple Rain?

Pretty darn rad.

Magic GarageBand Got Easier

Magic GarageBand was a pain to use before. You’d click on an instrument and maybe a few minutes later, it would switch over. Now the instruments switch over at the beginning of the next measure. It just seems more

iPad and iPhone as MIDI Controllers

Using Wi-Fi you can setup your iPad, iPod touch, or iPhone as a MIDI device if you have an app installed that utilizes OSC.

This is especially helpful if you want to play the piano but hate the keyboard version in GarageBand and you don’t have the money to go out and buy a MIDI keyboard for a few projects.

The apps will need an OSC server on your Mac. Some apps work with Pure Data, while others work best with OSCulator. Either way, you’ll be controlling GarageBand with your iPad or iPhone from across the room.

Awesome!

If you’re feeling like Wi-Fi just won’t cut it, Line 6 has the MIDI Mobilizer dock accessory.

Scoring

Feeling a little Mozart?

Add a Software Instrument. Play your song then click on the Scissors/edit button in the lower left hand corner. Then click on the score button. Now you can adjust the score of your masterpiece.

Select and drag your notes or Command+click to add new notes.

Adjust Audio in your Videos

Flex Time isn’t just for music.

In the Menu Bar go to Track > Show Movie Track

Open the Media Browser and click on the Movies tab. Grab one of your videos and drop it into the movie track.

Click on the edit Scissors at the bottom left of the GarageBand window and now you can stretch out the audio of your movie with Flex Time.

Just like your music, you can extend the length of your movie’s audio, including your dialogue. Yeah, it’s fun to make your words last 20 seconds. Especially if it’s a voice over. Besides the fun factor, this can be helpful for ADR that’s already tied to a video you have.

Top Tips for iLife and iWork

iPhoto

1. Enable scrolling zoom in Places maps
The new Places feature in iPhoto allows you to explore your photos on a map. Photos taken on a GPS enabled camera (i.e. the iPhone) will be automatically geo-tagged, or you can enter the location information manually. Annoyingly, by default the maps don’t allow you to zoom using the two-fingered scroll on the trackpad or a scroll wheel on your mouse. To enable this, just open up Terminal (in Applications/Utilities), type the following line and hit enter:

defaults write com.apple.iphoto MapScrollWheel -bool YES

To disable the scrolling zoom again, just repeat the command with NO at the end instead.

2. Include location information in uploaded photos
The default setting is for iPhoto to remove the geo-tagging information from your photos when you upload them to the web, presumably so people don’t unwittingly broadcast their location to the world. If you want to keep the location information in uploaded photos, go to the Web section of iPhoto preferences and check the box next to “Include location information for published photos.”

3. Set a key photo for someone
Changing a person’s key photo is exactly the same as changing the key photo for an event. Just move your mouse from left to right over their photo on the corkboard to cycle through all the photos of that person. When one you like is displayed, just hit the space bar to make that the new key photo. If you can’t find the one you want this way, just go into that person’s photos, right click on the new key photo and choose “Make Key Photo” from the contextual menu.

4. Enter information about a person
When you hold your mouse over someone in Faces, an small i appears. Clicking on this will allow you to enter a full name and email address for that person. It will also show you the number of photos with that person in, and the range of dates of photos they’re in.

5. Batch accept or reject faces
If you look at a person’s photos in Faces, there will be a group of unconfirmed faces that iPhoto has identified for you. To confirm a large group of faces at once, just drag across all the photos. To reject a group of photos, hold the Option key while doing this. You can also just Option-click on photos to reject them individually.

6. Corner-achored resize when adding faces
iPhoto’s default behaviour when adding a missing face is a centre-anchored resize. To change this to the usual corner-anchored resize, just hold down the option key when dragging over a face.

7. Easily switch between multiple libraries
iPhoto libraries are now double-clickable from the Finder. If you want to open a different library in iPhoto, just open up your Pictures folder and double-click a different library file. iPhoto will then load up with the new library. No need for holding Option on launch anymore.

GarageBand

8. Create iPhone ringtones
To create a free ringtone from any MP3 or AAC file just choose “Example Ringtone” from the iPhone Ringtones section in the New dialog. Delete the example that Apple has provided, then select a song from your iTunes library by clicking on the Media button in the bottom right. Drag your chosen song into your GarageBand project. Move and resize the yellow bar at the top to choose the section of the song you want to loop for your ringtone. Finally, choose “Send to iTunes” from the Share menu.

9. Use Learn to Play on PowerPC or Core Solo Macs
The new Learn to Play lessons in GarageBand require a dual core Intel based Mac to run. If you are running an old PowerPC Mac or Core Solo Mac Mini, you can get around this by going to /Library/Application Support/GarageBand/Learn to Play/Basic Lessons. Once here, double-click on one of the .mwand files to open it in GarageBand. Consider closing all the other applications on your Mac if the lessons run slowly.

iMovie

10. Get movies from other locations
If the videos you want aren’t in the Event Library, just right-click below your list of events to import videos from anywhere on your hard drive or from within an older iMovie file.

11. DVD chapters are back
One feature that disappeared for a while was the ability to add DVD chapters in iMovie. For a while you had to do a laborious work around involving GarageBand. Now you can add chapter markers in iMovie, and they’ll be carried across when you export to iDVD.

12. Add a location to travel maps
If you want to use a location in the travel maps feature that iMovie doesn’t have listed, you can add it to the locations file. Find iMovie in your applications folder, right-click on it and choose “Show Package Contents.” In the Resources folder find WorldLocations.txt and open it up in TextEdit. On a new line, enter the place name followed by a tab, then the region followed by a tab, then the country followed by a tab, and finally the latitude and longitude separated by a comma.

For example you could add:

Duxford   Cambridge   UK   52.093851,0.184870

iWork

13. Get the free trial
As well as the boxed version, Apple offers a free 30 day trial of iWork to download from their web site. One thing to remember though is if you don’t intend to upgrade after 30 days, remember to save any new or changed files back in the iWork ’08 format just in case they don’t work any more once your trial expires. You can do this by choosing iWork ’08 from the “Save copy as” menu in the Save As dialog.

14. Enable hidden picture frames
Pages, Keynote and Numbers all have various different styles of picture frame that you can place around any object by choosing it from the stroke menu in the Graphic Inspector. However, it turns out there are loads of frames that are disabled by default. You just need to edit a single file to enable them.

Choose the application where you want to enable the hidden frames (Pages, Keynote or Numbers), right click and choose “Show Package Contents”. Look in the Resources folder for one of the three following files:

For Pages, look for SLGraphicInspectorFrames.plist
For Keynote, look for BGGraphicInspectorFrames.plist
For Numbers, look for LSGraphicInspectorFrames.plist

Open it up in TextEdit, and notice how the names of the different picture frames are listed. The new frames available with iWork ’09 are Fine_Artist, Jet Set, Moroccan, Nature, Nature2, Typeset, Venetian, Venetian2, and Venetian3. For example just add Fine_Artist to the end of the list. As well as these new frames available in iWork ’09, there are many more that also work in iWork ’08 listed here.

http://nemws1.googlepages.com/keynoteframepreview


15. Temporarily disable guide lines
When moving objects around, all the iWork applications helpfully give alignment guides that will snap the objects so they are perfectly in line with each other. Sometimes, when you don’t want objects aligned or you want to align them in a different way, this can be quite annoying. The way to temporarily disable the guide lines is to hold down the command key while you are dragging the object. Now your shape, image or text box can be freely dragged to whatever position you want.

16. Password protect iWork documents
This is something that has been annoyingly difficult to do on the Mac for a long time. Generally previous solutions involved creating encrypted disk images, however, now all the iWork applications have a “Require password to open” option in the Document section of the Inspector.

17. Export has moved
The export command that used to be in the File menu has now moved to the Share menu. Also, remember that if you want to export to Microsoft Word format, you can now do this directly from the Save As… option.

18. Using the keyboard to create formulas in Numbers

When creating functions and formulas in numbers, you almost always want to refer to another cell or group of cells. In Numbers ’08 you had to use the mouse to select these cells, but now you can use the keyboard to select them. Simply hold down the Option key and use the arrow keys to move about. To select a group of cells, hold down Shift as well as Option, and continue using the arrow keys to make the selection. To change the reference from relative to absolute, just hit Command-K to cycle through all the different possibilities.

19. Advanced Gradients
The gradient fill options in iWork ’08 were fairly limited. In iWork ’09 you can now create linear or circular gradients with as many colours as you like by choosing “Advanced Gradient Fill” from the Fill menu.

20. Applescript in Numbers
One of the great new features of Numbers is Applescript support. Here are a few example scripts to give you an idea of what kind of thing is possible.

GarageBand

Creating a Project:

You start working in GarageBand by creating a new project.

To create a new project:

1. Choose File > New.
2. In the New Project dialog, select the type of project you want to create.
3. In the dialog that appears, browse to the location where you want to store the project, then type a name for the project in the Name field.
4. Set the project’s tempo, key, and time signature as described in the following sections.
5. When you have finished making the project settings, click Create.

Setting the Tempo:

Each project has a speed, or tempo. The tempo defines the rate at which beats, the
basic rhythmic pulse, occur in the project. The tempo is measured in beats per minute,
or bpm. You can set the tempo to any speed between 60 and 240 bpm.
The default tempo is 120 bpm, which is a common tempo used in popular music.

To set the tempo:

In the New Project dialog, drag the Tempo slider left to slow down the tempo, or right
to speed up the tempo.

Note: You can change the tempo later in the time display, located below the timeline,
or in the Track Info pane for the master track.

Setting the Key:

Each project has a key, which defines the central note to which the other notes in the
music relate, and the scale used (either “major” or “minor”).

To set the key:

1. In the New Project dialog, choose a key from the Key pop-up menu.
2. Choose the scale from the Scale pop-up menu to the right of the Key pop-up menu.

Note: You can change the key later in the Track Info pane for the master track.
If you change the key of a project after recording instruments or adding loops, all
Software Instrument recordings and loops are transposed to the new key. Real
Instrument recordings are not transposed.

Setting the Time Signature:

Each project also has a time signature, which controls the relationship between beats
and measures. A project’s time signature consists of two numbers separated by a
forward slash, which look similar to a fraction. The number on the left controls the
number of beats in each measure, and the number on the right controls the beat value
(the length of the note that gets one beat).

You can use any of the following time signatures in a GarageBand project:

  • 2/2, 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 5/4, 7/4, 6/8, 7/8, 9/8, or 12/8.

The default is 4/4, the most commonly used time signature.

To set the time signature:

In the New Project dialog, choose a time signature from the Time pop-up menu.

Note: You can change the time signature later in the Track Info pane for the
master track.


Opening an Existing Project:

You can open an existing project to continue working.

To open an existing project:

Choose File > Open, locate and select the project you want to open, then click OK.

You can also open a recently open project by choosing File > Open Recent and
choosing a project from the submenu.

If you close the currently open project, a dialog appears, asking if you want to create a
new project or open an existing project.


Saving a Project:

As you work, it’s important to save your project often so you don’t lose your changes.

To save a project:

Choose File > Save (or press Command-S).

When you save a project, by default GarageBand creates an iLife preview that is saved
with the project. An iLife preview lets you preview the project in the Media Browser
and in other iLife applications, but can increase the project’s file size. You can select
whether to create an iLife preview for projects in the General pane of GarageBand
Preferences.

You can also save a project as an archive. When you save a project as an archive, all the
audio files, loops, and other media the project uses are saved in the project file. This is
especially useful if you want to copy the project to another computer, or are
duplicating a project with your own Real Instrument recordings.

To save a project as an archive:

1. Choose File > Save as.
2. In the Save As dialog, select the Save As Archive checkbox.

You can also compact projects to make sharing easier.
Compacting a project reduces the file size by compressing audio in the project.
Compacting can result in some loss of audio quality.

To compact a project:

1. Choose File > Save as.
2. In the Save As dialog, select the Compact Project checkbox.
3. Choose the compression settings you want to use from the pop-up menu next to the Compact Project checkbox.

Sending a Project to iTunes:

You can send a project to an iTunes playlist, then play your exported projects in iTunes, download them to an iPod, or burn the playlist to a CD.
Files are exported to iTunes in AIFF format. You can convert the exported file to another format, such as AAC or MP3, from within iTunes.

To send a project to an iTunes playlist:

  • Choose Share > Send to iTunes.

The entire project, from the beginning (measure 1) to the end of the last region, is exported.

You can set the name of the iTunes playlist to which files will be exported, and also set
the name of the album and composer, in the Export pane of GarageBand Preferences.

You can also export a single track, or a group of tracks, to an iTunes playlist.
To export a single track, solo the track (or mute all other tracks) before exporting.
To export a group of tracks, solo the tracks (or mute all other tracks) before exporting.

What Is Mixing?

When you’ve built the arrangement of your project, the next step is to mix the project.
Mixing is where you step back and listen to the overall sound of the music, and make
changes to tracks and the project to balance the different parts, bring the music into
focus, and give it the right “sound.”

Mixing typically consists of the following steps:

  • Balancing volume levels
  • Setting pan positions
  • Creating dynamic changes with volume and pan curves
  • Shaping the music with effects

Setting Track Volume Levels:

The instruments and loops you use in your project may have different volume
(loudness) levels. In order to hear all the parts you’ve added, you balance the volume
levels so that no track overwhelms the others, and no track is lost in the mix.

This doesn’t mean that every track should be set to the same volume level. In
commercial mixes, certain tracks (typically the lead vocals, drums, and lead or solo
instruments) are louder, while other tracks (the backing instruments and vocals) are
softer.

To set track volume levels:

  • For each track, drag the volume slider left to lower the volume level, or drag it right to raise the volume level

Setting Track Pan Position:

Setting different tracks to different positions in the stereo field (panning) helps make it
easier to distinguish each track in the mix, and create a sense of three-dimensional
space to your project.

In commercial music, the most important tracks (typically the lead vocals, drums, and
lead or solo instruments) are panned to the center or close to center, while other tracks
(the backing instruments and vocals) are panned left and right. Panning tracks no
farther than 50 percent left or right creates a natural sense of space, while panning
tracks to the extreme left or right creates a more unusual, artificial sound.

To set track pan positions:

  • For each track, drag the pan dial left to pan the track farther to the left, or drag it right to pan the track farther to the right. You can also click along the edge of the dial to set it to a specific position.

Using Volume and Pan Curves:

In addition to setting track volume and pan, you can add volume and pan changes
over time using volume curves and pan curves. Making changes over time is called
automation, and GarageBand lets you automate volume and pan changes for each
track.

To turn on a track’s volume or pan curve:

1. Click the triangle to the right of the Solo button in the track’s header.
A blank row for the track’s volume and pan curves appears below the track.
2. From the pop-up menu on the left side of the row, choose Track Volume or Track Pan.

Once you turn on a track’s volume or pan curve, you make changes by adding control
points to the curve, then dragging the control points to change the value for volume or
pan at that point in time.

To add a control point:

  • Click the line in the editor at the point in time where you want to add a control point.

To adjust a control point, do one of the following:

  • Drag the control point up or down to a new value.
  • Drag the control point left or right to move it to a different point in time.

You can use the vertical lines in the row to line control points up with measures and
beats in the timeline.

Setting the Output Volume:

You can set the output volume of a project using the master volume slider, located
below the lower-right corner of the timeline. You should adjust the output volume to a
level high enough to eliminate background noise, but not high enough to cause
clipping.

The master volume slider controls the volume of the project when it is exported. Use
your computer’s volume control to adjust the volume at which you listen to the project
play.

To set the master volume:

  • Drag the master volume slider left to lower the output volume, or right to raise the output volume. Option-click the slider to return it to a neutral value (0 dB gain).
  • As the project plays, watch the master level meters located above the master volume slider. Before you export a project, make sure the small red dots to the right of the level meters are not lit. These dots (called clipping indicators) light to show that the volume level of the project at some point is too high, which will cause distortion or “clipping” in the exported project.

Adding Fade Ins and Fade Outs:

A very common mixing technique is to add a fade in at the beginning of a project, and
a fade out at the end of the project. Fade ins make the music seem to “come out of
nowhere,” and fade outs create the feeling that the project continues playing. You can
easily add fade ins and fade outs to your projects, and add other volume changes to
the project over time.

To add a fade in:

1. Choose Track > Show Master Track.
The master track appears at the bottom of the timeline.
2. From the pop-up menu in the master track’s header, choose Master Volume.
The master volume curve appears in the master track.
3. Click the master volume curve at the point you want the fade in to end.
4. Drag the control point at the beginning of the master track down to the volume level
at which you want the fade in to start. To start with complete silence, drag it all the way down.

Now play the project from the beginning. You’ll hear all the tracks in the project fade in gradually to their final volume level.

To add a fade out:

1. Choose Track > Show Master Track.
The master track appears at the bottom of the timeline.
2. From the pop-up menu in the master track’s header, choose Master Volume.
The master volume curve appears in the master track.
3. Click the master volume curve at the point you want the fade out to begin, then click
at the point you want the fade out to end.
4. Drag the second control point down to the volume level at which you want the fade
out to end. To end with complete silence, drag it all the way down.

Now play the project from a point before the fade out begins. You’ll hear all the tracks
in the project fade out gradually to their final volume level.


Transposing Part of a Project to a Different Key:

Many projects move to different keys at some point in the project; they may stay in the
new key, or return to the original key at a later point in time. You can move an entire
project to a new key, called transposing (or modulating), in the project’s master track.

To transpose part of a project to a different key:

1. Choose Track > Show Master Track.
The master track appears at the bottom of the timeline.
2. From the pop-up menu in the master track’s header, choose Master Pitch.
The master pitch curve appears in the master track.
3. Click the box to the left of the words “Master Pitch” to turn on the master pitch curve.
4. Click the master pitch curve at the point you want to change the pitch of the project.
5. Drag the control point up or down to the new key. Unlike with volume and pan curves, the control points on the master pitch curve move in discrete steps of a semitone.

Note: When you transpose a project to a new key, Real and Software Instruments (both
those you’ve recorded and loops) are transposed. Any audio files added from the Finder
are not transposed.

Using Effects:

Effects let you shape and enhance the sound of your music in a variety of ways. Anyone
who’s listened to popular music on the radio, or listened to the soundtrack of a movie,
has heard the different effects used in contemporary music.
GarageBand includes a complete set of studio-quality effects that you can use on individual tracks or the overall project to shape the sound of your music.

GarageBand includes the following types of effects:

Equalization (EQ): EQ is a powerful and versatile effect that lets you change the level
of selected frequencies. You can use EQ to make both subtle and dramatic changes to
your projects. EQ is likely the most commonly used effect in popular music.

Dynamics: Dynamics effects, which include compressors and noise gates, let you
control the volume of your music over time.
Reverb and Echo: Reverb and echo are both time-based effects. Time-based effects
store a copy of the sound and play it back at a later point in time, creating a sense of
space.

Modulation: Modulation effects, which include chorus, flangers, and phasers, build on
the time-based effects by shifting or modulating when the copied signal plays back.
They can also involve detuning the copied signal relative to the original.
Distortion: Distortion effects, which include amp simulation and overdrive (and, of
course, distortion!), change the tone of the original sound to recreate analog or digital
distortion.

Other effects: Other effects included with GarageBand, such as tremolo and Auto
Filter, change the sound in different ways.

Adding Effects:

Each Real and Software Instrument track has a set of effects, which include a
compressor, equalizer (EQ), echo, and reverb. You can adjust a track’s effects, and add
up to two additional effects, in the Track Info pane. Real Instrument tracks also include
a noise gate effect.

The master track includes its own effects. You can adjust the master effects and add
one additional effect to the master track in the Track Info pane.

To add an effect:

1. Click the Track Info button (the letter “i”) or choose Track > Show Track Info to show the
Track Info pane.
2. If needed, click the Details triangle to show the Effects section of the window.
3. Choose the effect you want to add from one of the pop-up menus along the left.
Instrument tracks have two effect pop-up menus, and the master track has one.

Adjusting Effects:

Each effect has either a slider that you can use to adjust the amount of the effect, or a
pop-up menu from which you can choose different effect presets.

To adjust a track’s effects:

1. Select the track, then click the Track Info button to open the Track Info pane.
2. Click the Details triangle to reveal the track’s effects settings.
3. Drag the sliders for the Gate, Compressor, Echo, and Reverb effects to adjust the
amount of each effect. Choose a new setting from the Equalizer pop-up menu to adjust
the equalization. If your project is playing, you hear the changes in real time.
4. Choose an effect from one of the effect pop-up menus on the left, then choose an
effect setting for the effect from the preset pop-up menu on the right.

Additional effects you can add include treble reduction, bass reduction, amp
simulation, chorus, flanging, phase shifting, and tremolo.


Turning Effects On and Off:

You can turn individual effects on or off (turning an effect off temporarily is called
bypassing the effect). This has several advantages: It lets you hear how each effect
changes the sound of your music, and lets you see which effects have the greatest
impact on your computer’s performance.

When you turn off an effect, the effect’s current settings are retained, so any
adjustments you have made are not lost.

To turn an effect off:

  • In the Effects section of the Track Info pane, deselect the checkbox next to the effect. Select the checkbox to turn the effect on again.

Choosing Effect Presets:

Some effects includes several presets, which let you easily adjust the effect’s settings to achieve a particular sound.

To choose an effect preset:

  • Choose the preset you want from the pop-up menu to the right of the effect.

Editing Effect Presets:

You can adjust effect presets to fine tune the sound of the effect, and save your own
presets to use with other instruments or in another project.

To edit an effect preset:

1. Click the Edit button (with the pencil icon) to the right of the effect’s preset pop-up
menu.

The effect’s Preset window appears. Each preset setting has a slider, button, or other
control, which is labeled to indicate its purpose.

2. Drag the sliders in the Preset window to adjust the settings for the preset.

When you adjust an effect preset, it appears as “Manual” in the pop-up menu, so you
know you’ve changed it from the original preset. You can go back and forth between
your Manual settings and other presets to compare them before saving the new preset.

Saving Effect Presets:

You can create your own effect presets and save them to use on another track or in
another project.

To save an effect preset:

1. Adjust the settings for the preset to get the sound that you want.
2. Choose Make Preset from the pop-up menu, then type a name for the preset in the Save dialog.

The Editor:

The editor is like a microscope showing a close-up view of part of a track.
You can edit Real and Software Instrument regions in a variety of ways in the editor.

For Real Instruments:

When you select a Real Instrument track, the editor shows the waveform of the track or selected region.
You can move, crop, join, transpose, and rename regions in the editor.


A – Region Name field: Type a new name for the selected region in the field.

B – Region Pitch slider and field: Drag the slider to transpose the selected Real Instrument region up or down by up to 12 semitones.
You can also type the number of semitones in the field.

C – Zoom slider: Drag to zoom in for a closer view or to zoom out to see more of the track or selected region.
Zooming in the editor is independent of the timeline.

D – Beat ruler: Shows beats and measures for the area visible in the editor.

E – Playhead: Shows the point in the project currently playing.

F – Waveform display: Shows the waveform of the regions in the track.

G – Enhance Tuning slider and checkbox: Drag right to increase the amount of tuning enhancement, or drag left to lower the amount.
The limit to key checkbox limits tuning enhancement to the project’s key.

H – Enhance Timing slider and pop-up menu: Drag right to increase the amount of timing enhancement, or drag left to lower the amount.
Choose the note value to use and the basis for timing enhancement from the pop-up menu.

I – Scroll bar: Drag the scroller to move to a different part of the track.

For Software Instruments—Graphic View:

When you select a Software Instrument track, the editor shows a graphic display of the track or selected region.
You can edit individual notes in Software Instrument regions, fix the timing of notes, and transpose and rename regions.
You can also show and edit controller data for pitch bend, a modulation wheel, or a sustain pedal, recorded when you play your music keyboard.

A – Region Name field: Type a new name for the selected region in the field.

B – Region Pitch slider and field: Drag the slider to transpose the selected Software Instrument region up or down by up to 36 semitones.
You can also type the number of semitones in the field.

C -Velocity slider and field: Drag the slider to change the velocity of selected notes.
You can also type the velocity value in the field. A note’s velocity reflects how hard the key is pressed when you play the note.

D – Zoom slider: Drag to zoom in for a closer view or to zoom out to see more of the track.

E – Graphic/Notation View buttons: Click to change the editor to graphic view or notation view.

F – Display pop-up menu: Choose whether to show notes or controller data in the editor.

G – Fix Timing button: Click to fix the timing of notes in the selected region, or notes selected in the editor, so that notes move to the nearest grid position.

H – Beat ruler: Shows beats and measures for the area visible in the editor.

I – Playhead: Shows the point in the project currently playing.

J – Notes/controller data display: Shows the individual notes of Software Instrument regions in a graphic format.
You can move and resize notes to adjust their pitch, where they start playing, and how long they play.
Shows controller data when chosen in the Display pop-up menu.

K – Scroll bar: Drag the scroller to move to a different part of a track.

For Software Instruments—Notation View:

You can also view Software Instrument tracks and regions in notation view.
In notation view, notes and other musical events are shown in standard music notation.
You can edit notes and edit controller information (including velocity and pedal markings for sustain) in notation view.

A – Region Name field: Type a new name for the selected region in the field.

B – Region Pitch slider and field: Drag the slider to transpose the selected Software Instrument region up or down by up to 36 semitones.
You can also type the number of semitones in the field.

C – Velocity slider and field: Drag the slider to change the velocity of selected notes.
You can also type the velocity value in the field.
A note’s velocity reflects how hard the key is pressed when you play the note.

D – Zoom slider: Drag to zoom in for a closer view or to zoom out to see more of the track.

E – Graphic/Notation View buttons: Click to change the editor to graphic view or notation view.

F – Note Value button: Click to choose the note value for notes you add.

G – Fix Timing button: Click to fix the timing of notes in the selected region, or notes selected in the editor, so that notes move to the nearest grid position.

H – Beat ruler: Shows beats and measures for the area visible in the editor.

I – Playhead: Shows the point in the project currently playing.

J – Notation display: Shows the musical events of Software Instrument regions in standard music notation.
You can move notes to adjust their pitch and where they start playing, and change how long they play.

K – Scroll bar: Drag the scroller to move to a different part of a track.

For Podcasts and Video—Marker View:

When you are working on a podcast episode, you can view and edit markers in the editor.
In the marker list you can edit each marker’s time position, marker region artwork, URL, URL title, and chapter title.
You can also add episode artwork in the editor.


A – Preview: (Appears only when creating a podcast.)

B – Marks a Chapter checkbox: Shows whether the selected marker marks a chapter.

  • Displays Artwork checkbox: Shows whether the selected marker contains marker region artwork. (Appears only when creating a podcast.)
  • Displays URL checkbox: Shows whether the selected marker has a URL.

C – Add Marker button: Add a marker at the playhead position.

D – Marker list: Shows each marker’s start time, artwork (for podcasts) or video frame (for videos), chapter title, URL, and URL title.

E – Time column: Shows the start time for each marker.

F – Artwork column: Shows the artwork for each marker region.
Add artwork by dragging image files from the Media Browser. (Appears only when creating a podcast.)

  • Still Frame column: Shows the video frame at the position of each marker. (Appears only when working with a video.)

G – Chapter Title column: Shows the title of each chapter marker. Click and type a title for a marker.

H – URL Title column: Shows the title of each marker region’s URL. Click and type a title for the URL.

I – URL column: Shows the URL for each marker region. Type a URL (address) for the website for which you want to show a link.

Selecting Regions:

In order to edit a region in the editor, you first select the region in the timeline.

To select a region, do one of the following:

  • Select a single region by clicking it.
  • Select multiple regions by Shift-clicking.
  • Drag from a point before the first region to a point after the last one to select the regions in between.

Editing Real Instrument Regions:

You can edit Real Instrument regions in the editor in several ways.

You can:

  • Move regions
  • Crop part of a region
  • Join regions
  • Enhance the tuning of single-note (monophonic) regions
  • Enhance the timing of regions

The editor includes its own grid, which you can set independently of the grid for the timeline, using the Grid button in the upper-right corner of the editor.

Moving Real Instrument Regions:

You can move Real Instrument regions in the editor in order to align them precisely with measures and beats, or with other regions.

To move a Real Instrument region in the editor:

1. Move the pointer over the top part of the region, close to the beat ruler.
The pointer becomes a move pointer (a vertical line with arrows pointing left and right).
2. Drag the region to its new position.

Cropping Part of a Real Instrument Region:

You can easily cut part of a Real Instrument region, whether at the beginning, the end, or in the middle of the region.
This is especially useful if you want to delete, move, or copy an individual note, chord, or phrase in a region.

To crop part of a Real Instrument region:

1. Move the pointer over the place where you want to cut the region (except at the top).
The pointer becomes a crop pointer (a crosshair).
2. Drag to select the part of the region you want to crop.
The selected part of the region appears darker blue.
3. Click the selected part of the region.
4. The selected part is cropped from the rest of the region, and is now a separate region.
You can select it, delete it, move it, or copy it, just as you would any Real Instrument region.

Joining Real Instrument Regions:

You can join Real Instrument regions that are next to each other in the editor.

To join regions:

  • Select the regions, then choose Edit > Join (or press Command-J).

Enhancing the Tuning of Real Instrument Tracks:

You can enhance the tuning of a Real Instrument track.
This is especially useful when you record Real Instrument regions that have the right “feel” and timing but are not perfectly in tune.

When you use the Enhance Tuning slider, all regions on the selected track (both your own recordings and loops) are enhanced.
Enhance Tuning can only produce accurate results on single-note (monophonic) Real Instrument regions, so be sure the track does not include regions with chords or unpitched sounds.

By default, Enhance Tuning enhances the tuning of notes by moving them to the closest note in the project’s key.

You can limit the enhancement to the notes of the chromatic scale instead by deselecting the “Limit to key” checkbox.

To enhance the tuning of a Real Instrument track:

1. In the timeline, select the Real Instrument track you want to enhance.
2. Drag the Enhance Tuning slider right to increase the amount of tuning enhancement, or drag it left to decrease the amount of enhancement.
3. To limit tuning enhancement to the chromatic scale, deselect the “Limit to key” checkbox below the slider.

You hear the results immediately as the project plays.

Setting the Enhance Tuning slider to higher values can sometimes lead to undesirable results.
Listen carefully to the results of using the slider and set it to the value that sounds best.


Enhancing the Timing of Real Instrument Tracks
:

You can enhance the timing of a Real Instrument track.
This is especially useful when you record Real Instrument regions where the notes are the right pitch, but are not perfectly in time with the project.

When you use the Enhance Timing slider, all regions on the selected track (both your own recordings and loops) are enhanced.
You can enhance the timing of single-note, chordal, and percussion (unpitched) Real Instrument regions.
Enhance Timing works better with regions that contain distinct patterns of notes than with pads or ambient sounds.

To enhance the timing of a Real Instrument track:

1. In the timeline, select the Real Instrument region you want to enhance.
2. Drag the Enhance Timing slider to the right to increase the amount of timing enhancement, or drag it left to decrease the amount of enhancement.

If you move the Enhance Timing slider while the project is playing, it may take a moment for it to “catch up” with the music.

The Enhance Timing slider may not work equally well with all musical material, especially when set to higher values.

Listen carefully to the results of using the slider and set it to the value that sounds best.

Editing Software Instrument Regions:

You can edit Software Instrument regions in the editor in several ways.

You can:

  • Edit individual notes (including the note’s pitch, duration, and timing)
  • Edit controller information (including velocity, mod wheel, pitch bend, and sustain)


Editing Notes in a Software Instrument Region:

You can edit individual notes of a Software Instrument region.

When you view the region in the editor, individual notes in the region are displayed in a graphic format:

  • The left edge of the note shows the point in the timeline it starts playing.
  • The width of the note shows how long it plays.
  • The vertical position of the note shows its pitch, in relation to the piano keyboard displayed vertically along the left edge of the editor.

You can drag notes to a new starting point, resize notes to shorten or lengthen how long they play, and drag notes up or down to a different pitch.
You can also select multiple notes and edit them at the same time.

Note: To edit notes in the editor, you may need to zoom in so that the notes are large
enough to select and edit.

To edit notes in a Software Instrument region:

  • Drag the note left or right to a new starting point. You can use the beat ruler in the editor to align the note with a specific beat or measure.
  • Drag the lower-right corner of the note to resize it.
  • Drag the note up or down to raise or lower its pitch. Use the piano keyboard along the left edge of the editor to see the pitches.

You can also select multiple notes in the editor, and edit them at the same time.

To select multiple notes:

  • Shift-click or Command-click the notes you want to select.
  • Drag from a point before the first note to a point after the last note, enclosing the notes you want to select.

When you edit multiple notes, each note is changed by the same amount.

For example, if you select several notes and drag them to a new starting point, each note is moved by the same number of beats.
If you resize several notes at the same time, each note is shortened or lengthened by the same amount. If you drag several notes up or down to a different pitch, each note is changed by the same number of semitones.

You can also fix the timing of individual notes in the editor.
When you fix the timing of notes in the editor, the selected notes move to the nearest grid position, as set in the timeline grid menu in the upper-right corner of the editor.

To fix the timing of individual notes:

  • Select the notes you want to fix in the editor, then click the Fix Timing button (with the text “Align to” followed by a note value).


Editing Controller Information in a Software Instrument Region:

Most music keyboards designed to be used with computer music programs include “controllers” for pitch bend and modulation.
These controllers are often circular “wheels” placed at the left end of the keyboard. Some keyboards also include other controllers, such as a sustain pedal, a foot controller, or an expression control.

Moving the pitch bend wheel while you play causes the notes you play to bend up or down in pitch, like a guitar.
Moving the modulation wheel creates changes in the sound of the Software Instrument.
The changes are different for different instruments, but often involve changing the frequency, rate, or intensity of a filter applied to the instrument.

If you move a controller while recording a Software Instrument, the movements are recorded in the Software Instrument region.
You can see the movements you recorded and edit them in the editor.

To display controller information for a Software Instrument region:

1. Double-click the region to open it in the editor.
2. Choose the type of controller information you want to see from the Display pop-up menu.

Controller information is displayed as a line with “dots” at different points in time, similar to the way volume and pan curves are displayed in the timeline.
Each “dot” (called a control point) shows a change in value (in this case the movements of the controller) at that point in time.
You can edit the controller information by adding new control points, and by adjusting control points to change their value or to change where in the timeline they occur.

To add a control point:

  • Click the line in the editor at the point where you want to add a control point.

To adjust a control point, do one of the following:

  • Drag the control point up or down to a new value.
  • Drag the control point left or right to move it to a different point in time.

You can also view and edit Software Instrument regions in notation view in the editor.