iMovie Tips

128Get Your Touch On
Apple may not feel that touchscreen computers are in its future, but they aren’t shy about adding multitouch gestures to their desktop apps for laptop users and those of us rocking a Magic Trackpad. iMovie ’11 is no exception, and features a trio of such gestures.

The first multitouch tip enables adding new media to your Project, which is done by first selecting a clip (or portion of a clip) in the Event browser and then using three fingers to swipe up on the trackpad. Just like magic, your selection is now added to the end of your project.

The second gesture allows you to expand or contract filmstrips by moving the pointer over the Event or Project browser and pinching two fingers closed to contract or pinching two fingers open to expand — a gesture that should be very familiar to users of the company’s iOS devices.

Finally, if you want to move a clip within your project to either the left or right of the clip next to it, simply select the desired clip and then swipe left or right with three fingers accordingly. Let’s see iMovie’s big brother, Final Cut Pro, do that!

Import Movies Directly from Your iPhone
Although the new desktop version of iMovie ’11 is sadly lacking in any interoperability with the stripped-down iOS version, there is one welcome iPhone-related change from iMovie ’09 — you can now plug in your iPhone and iMovie will recognize it and offer to import any movies in your Camera Roll.

This newfound ability might not have been such a big deal in the iPhone 3GS days with its low-resolution SD camera, but it’s now a must-have for the iPhone 4’s 720p HD video — especially for more ambitious projects that go beyond the scope of the mobile version of iMovie. (Note that import will also work on the 3GS, for those of you still rockin’ last year’s handset.)

Analyze This
iMovie ’09 added a very welcome Stabilization function to the program’s bag of tricks in order to help smooth out jumpy or handheld footage. That function first required a clip to be analyzed in order to perform its magic, which could be a lengthy process for longer pieces of video.

Now that Apple has added the People Finder feature to iMovie ’11, you’ll be happy to know that you can analyze clips for both Stabilization and People in one fell swoop — along with the option to do only Stabilization or only People.

Clips that have already been analyzed for Stabilization can also now be marked for camera pans, noting when the camera moves left or right. Choose File > Analyze Video > Mark Camera Pans and now video with camera pans will be indicated with a blue line across the top of the clip, and you can even filter for those type of actions when your editing calls for it.

Viewing Your Timeline In A More Traditional Way

When iMovie ’08 was first released in mid-2007, many of us who were used to more traditional ways of editing were stymied by the way projects were now viewed in a stacked ribbon — since the dawn of non-linear editing, timelines have mostly been viewed as one seemingly endless horizontal strip. Someone at Apple must have taken note of the fact that we still haven’t quite adjusted to it three years later, so now you can take matters into your own hands.

First navigate to iMovie>Preferences and turn on Show Advanced Tools under the General tab.

In the upper right corner of the Project window, you’ll now find a new Horizontal Display button to the left of the chapter mark tool. With a stacked view in your Project, click the Horizontal Display button and you’ll now see a nice clean, all-horizontal view of your project as you edit. Click it again to go back to the classic stacked view, but only if you must!

Making iMovie ’11 More Like Final Cut

These tips aren’t new to iMovie ’11, but f you want the program to look more like the traditional view of higher-end apps like Final Cut Pro.

Switch the timeline to the bottom of the screen and your unedited media to the top by selecting Window > Swap Events and Projects (or click the Swap button positioned between the windows, to the right of the Import button). After a fancy animated switcheroo, your Event Library and media now appear at the top of the display and your timeline resides at the bottom, a view that will likely be more comfortable to seasoned editors.

The horizontal timeline view and window swap tips work best If you also happen to have a second display attached to your computer. In iMovie ’11, you can select Window > Viewer on Other Display and move your view of the edited project to its own screen, giving you the entire top (or bottom) of the iMovie display to see your newly emancipated Project timeline — and have a swanky editing setup just like the pros use.

Title Duplicate
If you spend a lot of time creating videos with iMovie, you’ll certainly appreciate some of the new version’s little niceties, many of which have been moved from the Edit menu and grouped into a new Clip menu along with the new one-step effects.

For instance, how many times have you created a project with a number of similar title cards, spending valuable time having to add a stock title each time and then editing it to match the length and font style of your previous one? Now all you need to do is select a clip (or range of frames) and choose Clip > Duplicate Last Title, edit the text to suit you and move on.

Inspecting Your Inspector
With your iMovie Preferences set up to edit a clip when you double-click on it (rather than Play the clip), the clip Inspector is always available quickly, same as in the previous iMovie ’09. But there are some cool new functions tucked away there that you may have overlooked.
In addition to now changing the speed of a clip without having to convert it first (by moving the slider or typing the speed you want as a percentage), you can now reverse it with a single click, a nifty tool which has been available on more sophisticated non-linear editors for some time.

iMovie ’11 also adds a new Rolling Shutter option which helps to cut down on wobbly or skewed video caused by the CMOS image sensor still prevalent on most consumer camcorders. Click on “Reduce motion distortion” to enable it for a clip and after your video is analyzed, use the pulldown to select an amount from None to Extra High. Apple recommends High or Extra High for footage shot with a Flip camcorder or a mobile phone that records video, which presumably includes the iPhone 4. (It did indeed look better in our quick, unscientific tests.)

Equalize Your iLife
Audio is a big focus of iMovie ’11, with most of the spotlight on the slick new audio waveform mode to adjust levels and see color-coded warnings where the sound might be too overpowering. But Apple has also beefed up audio options in the Inspector as well, including a new Equalizer.

Open the clip in question, select the Audio tab on the Inspector and you’ll see the new Equalizer function, which you can customize entirely on your own or pick from one of nine presets, including Voice Enhance, Music Enhance and Hum Reduction, which should help tame less than dynamic audio recordings and keep annoying electrical line hums at bay.

Apple’s engineers didn’t stop there, also adding an audio Enhance mode — click on “Reduce background noise by” and adjust the slider, then listen to the results. We tried it on some clips recorded near a busy highway and it worked quite well, bringing down the unwanted background noise and making people speaking in the foreground that much more audible.

Audio Effects

While iMovie ’09 had some very capable video effects, this year’s release adds an equal number of audio effects to spice up most any production.

To get to the audio effects, select a clip. Click on the Inspector button or go to Window>Clip Adjustment in the Menu Bar.

Click on Audio Effect in the Clip tab.

In addition to specialized effects such as Robot, Cosmic and Telephone, you also have the ability to add Echo, four sizes of Room Echo and four variations of Pitch Down or Pitch Up.

Integrate with Facebook

Thanks to the updated iPhoto, the whole iLife ’11 benefits from deeper integration with the social network everyone loves to hate, Facebook. That integration also carries over to iMovie, where you can now choose from your online Facebook photos to import into a project, as well as the traditional iPhoto and PhotoBooth options.

Keep in mind that you’ll first need to open iPhoto ’11 and let the program sync with Facebook, which will then carry those photo albums into your iLife Media Browser and make them available to all supported programs.

Contextual Menus
Apple hasn’t forgotten about the ever-handy contextual menus in iMovie ’11; functions such as Loop Selection and the ability to both Analyze and Optimize clips have been added to adjust clips within a Project, as well as the aforementioned new Duplicate Last Title and options to Arrange Music Tracks and select your Project Theme.

Event browser clips can also now be looped or have their video analyzed — for Stabilization and People, Stabilization only, People only to to Mark Camera Pans. There is also the ability to Split Event Before Clip as well as the same shortcut to make adjustments to your Project Theme.

In addition to the contextual menus we’ve all come to love and depend on, you can launch the Inspector directly from a clip and put iMovie ’11 in Precision editor Mode by clicking on the gear that appears when you hover over a clip.

Storyboard Like a Pro
iMovie ’11 is touting a Movie Trailers mode, giving you the ability to create short, Hollywood-style previews with just a few clicks. But you can also use the animatics provided by the Movie Trailers feature to rough out your own project, and then swap them out for footage you shoot later.

Go to Window > Maps, Backgrounds and Animatics (which used to be called just Maps & Backgrounds) and scroll down to find 16 animatics, which are essentially motion-enabled dummy clips for various camera angles, such as Closeup, Medium, Wide, Landscape and Animal.

iMovie ’11 provides a mix of clips for males or females — simply drag & drop one of them to your timeline and you’ll have a filler clip that can later be replaced with a real clip by dragging the new clip onto the animatic. Release your mouse button and click Replace, and the job is done. Animatics are a great way to organize your thoughts and plan for footage you haven’t had time to shoot, but still be able to see if your concept fits into your work-in-progress.

Connect your camera or camcorder

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Digital cameras and camcorders allow you to capture memorable events. Learn how to import your photos and videos from your camera or camcorder.

Digital cameras
With iPhoto, you can organize, edit, and share your photos. Your friends and family may enjoy your vacation videos even more after you edit the footage in iMovie.

If your looking for more professional approach to editing and enhancing photos and videos, try Aperture for retouching photos or Final Cut Pro for video editing.

You have to import your photos and movies into your Mac first, which brings us to this lesson: Connect your camera or camcorder to your Mac.

Although many cameras can be connected to your computer without installing any software, check the documentation that came with your camera to see what your model requires; some manufacturers require or recommend that you install software to get the full benefits from your camera.

If you want to use iPhoto to view and edit your pictures

  1. Make sure you have the latest iPhoto and OS X updates installed by checking the App Store (OS X Lion) or Software Update preferences.
  2. Connect your camera to your Mac using the USB cable that came with your camera. Note: If your Mac has an SD card slot and your camera uses a compatible SD card, you can simply insert the card into your Mac instead of connecting the camera via a USB cable (then skip to step 4).
  3. Turn on your camera. If your camera needs to be set to a certain mode to transfer photos, do so now but check your camera manual if you’re not sure how. The camera or more precisely, its media card, appears in the devices section of the Finder sidebar as a mounted volume.
  4. Open iPhoto, if it does not open automatically.
  5. iPhoto displays your camera or the name you gave your media card in the devices list of the iPhoto sidebar.
  6. Type a name for your group of photos in the Event Name field, such as “Nevada Vacation” or “Company Party Photos.”
  7. Click Import Selected to only import selected photos from your camera, or click Import All to import all photos from your camera. iPhoto wlll import pictures and movies from your camera.
  8. When prompted, click Delete Photos to delete them from your camera or SD card. Or, click Keep Photos to keep them on your cameras or SD card.
  9. To disconnect the camera or SD card when finished, click the eject button next to the camera icon in the devices list. When the camera or card disappears from the list, you can safely disconnect it.

To transfer images from your camera using Image Capture

These steps will copy image files from your camera to wherever you wish on your hard drive, but not to iPhoto’s library. You can later add them to iPhoto if you wish.

  1. Connect your camera to your Mac using the USB cable that came with your camera. Note: If your Mac has an SD card slot and your camera uses a compatible SD card, you can simply insert the card into your Mac instead of connecting the camera via a USB cable (then skip to step 3).
  2. Turn on your camera. If your camera needs to be set to a certain mode to transfer photos, do so now by simply checking your camera’s manual. The camera or more precisely, its media card appears on the desktop as a mounted volume.
  3. Open Image Capture (located in Applications). Note: If iPhoto opens automatically, you can quit it.
  4. Select the media card of your camera from the devices list, if it is not already selected.
  5. At the bottom of the devices and shared list, you can choose to delete photos from your camera after importing them and you can choose which application opens when you reconnect your camera or card to your computer.
  6. From the import To pop-up menu, choose where you want Image Capture to download your files.
  7. If you want to import all the photos from your camera, click Import All. If you only want selected photos imported, choose the photos you want and then click Import. Tip: By pressing and holding down the Command key and clicking the photos you can select multiple photos. The photos you select will be highlighted (as shown in the figure above).
  8. All photos that you import will have a green checkmark indicating they have been imported.
  9. To disconnect the camera or SD card, click the eject button to the right of the media card in the devices list of Image Capture.

To manually download photos
Many cameras allow you to manually copy your images using the Finder. Use these steps to copy your camera’s photo and movie files by simply dragging and dropping the files from the camera volume to your hard drive:

Connect your camera to your Mac using the USB cable that came with your camera.
Note: If your Mac has an SD card slot and your camera uses a compatible SD card, you can simply insert the card into your Mac instead of connecting the camera via a USB cable (then skip to step 3).
  1. Turn on your camera. If your camera needs to be set to a certain mode to transfer photos, do so now. You may want to check your camera manual if you’re not sure how. The camera or more precisely, its media card, appears in the devices section of the Finder sidebar as a mounted volume.
  2. Double-click the volume to open it and open the DCIM folder, which holds your pictures.
  3. Drag the image files or folder to your desktop or any folder on your hard drive to copy them. You can then open the files in any graphics application, and even import them into iPhoto if you want by dragging the files into the album section of the iPhoto sidebar.
  4. To delete all photos from the media card in your camera, you can either drag the DCIM folder to the Trash and then empty the Trash, or delete the images using your camera’s controls.
  5. To disconnect the camera, drag the volume icon to the Trash, it turns into an Eject icon. When the icon disappears from the desktop, you can safely disconnect your camera.

Camcorders
Here’s how to connect a camcorder to your computer and capture footage in iMovie.

  1. Connect your camcorder to your computer, using the FireWire or USB cable that came with it. Typically for FireWire, a 6-pin to 4-pin FireWire cable, plug the small end (4-pin) connector into your camera’s FireWire port.
  2. Turn on your camera and set it to PC Connect mode (this mode may have a different name on your camera).
  3. Open iMovie.
  4. If the Import window doesn’t open, choose File > Import from Camera from the iMovie menu, or click the video camera button above the Event Library list. The Import window displays all the video clips on your camera.
  5. You can use the playback controls in the iMovie interface to view your camera footage in the iMovie monitor pane.
  6. To select all clips, set the Automatic/Manual switch to Automatic, and then click Import All. To import specific clips, set the Automatic/Manual switch to Manual. Deselect the clips you don’t want to import, and click Import Checked. The first time you import from a video camera that records high-definition (HD) video, an HD Import Setting dialog appears. Even if you aren’t importing high-definition, video now, select Large or Full, and then click OK.
  7. From the Save to pop-up menu, choose a location to store the videos.
  8. in the Create new Event field enter a event name and then click Import.

iMovie

Customizing:

Using analog/FireWire converter devices with iMovie:

You can convert video in 8 mm, Hi8, VHS, or SVHS format to digital video (DV) format, using a special converter box (sometimes referred to as AV adapters), such as the Sony DVMC-DA2 or the Synchrotech Formac Studio.
If you use a converter to import non-DV video, you can’t control your camera or deck with iMovie. However, you can manually control the camera to import video clips and use all of iMovie’s editing features, then export your video through the converter back to your video recorder or camera.

A converter of this kind will generally have standard S-video and RCA input/output ports for video and audio, and a FireWire or iLink (IEEE 1394) input/output port. Make sure you have the appropriate cables for your configuration.

To ensure compatibility with third-party video devices, check the iLife Camcorder Compatibility page, the Apple Store, and/or vendor websites for compatibility information.

For more information, check the documentation that came with your converter.

Capturing Analog Video From a Converter Box Into iMovie:

Follow these steps to import video from an analog-to-FireWire converter device.
While this specific order may not be necessary with all converters, it will help ensure proper initialization between the hardware and software:

  1. Start up your computer, turn on the converter box, and connect the computer to the converter with a FireWire cable.
  2. Connect the video cable from the video output of the video source (for example, a VCR or video camera) to the analog video input of the converter box. A video camera should be in playback or VTR mode. Connect the audio source, too.
  3. The converter box will typically have a switch or button that tells the device which direction to convert the video, analog to DV or DV to analog. For capturing analog video, you will want to press the button labeled “Analog In” or something similar.
  4. Connect a 4-to-6 pin FireWire cable from the DV out port on the converter box (sometimes labeled FireWire, IEEE 1394, or iLink with Sony devices) to a FireWire port on the computer.
  5. Open the iMovie application program.
  6. Make sure the Mode Switch under the iMovie monitor is set to Camera Mode, as shown here:
  7. Some converter boxes have a green status light, to indicate a good connection. If this light is amber or red at this point, try turning the device off for several seconds and then back on again. You may also try quitting and opening iMovie again.
  8. Press play on the VCR or analog camera. You should see the video signal in the iMovie monitor. If you have speakers or headphones connected to the VCR you can monitor the audio.
  9. Use the controls on the video source to manually cue the video tape to the desired spot, and click Import in iMovie. iMovie will create a new clip for about every nine minutes of video. You can join all the clips later by dragging them into the timeline.

Sending Video From iMovie to the Converter Box:

Follow these steps to export video to an analog-to-FireWire converter box.
While this specific order may not be necessary with all converters, it will help ensure proper initialization between the hardware and software:

  1. Start up your computer, turn on the converter box, and connect the computer to the converter with a FireWire cable.
  2. Connect the video cable from the video output of the source (for example, a VCR or video camera) to the analog video input of the converter box. A video camera should be in playback or VTR mode. Connect the audio source, too.
  3. The converter box will typically have a switch or button which tells the device which direction to convert the video, analog to DV or DV to analog. For exporting analog video, you will want to press the button labeled “Analog In” or something similar.
  4. Connect a 4-to-6 pin FireWire cable from the DV out port on the converter box (sometimes labeled FireWire, IEEE 1394, or iLink with Sony devices) to a FireWire port on the computer.
  5. Open the iMovie application program.
  6. From the iMovie menu, choose Preferences (or File menu in Mac OS 9).
  7. Click the Advanced tab.
  8. Make sure the checkbox for “Video Play Through to Camera” is selected.
  9. Choose Export Movie from the File menu, or press Command-E on the keyboard.
  10. In the Export Movie window, select the pop-up menu for “Export to Camera”, even if you’re exporting to a VCR through the converter.
  11. Press record on the VCR and click Export in iMovie.
  12. When finished, press the stop button on the VCR and Stop in the iMovie monitor.


Publishing:

Publishing directly to YouTube:

You can publish your iMovie project directly to the YouTube website. YouTube is an independent website that freely hosts videos by its community members. To post to YouTube, you must have a YouTube account.

To publish to YouTube:

  • Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > YouTube.
  • Choose your account in the Account pop-up menu.
  • If you don’t have a YouTube account, click Add to be guided through the account creation process on the YouTube website.
  • Choose a category from the pop-up menu for the video to be categorized on the YouTube website.
  • Fill in the following fields:
  • Title: The name of your movie.
  • Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  • Tags: Keywords that viewers can use to search for and find your movie.
  • Select the mobile or medium size for your movie.

If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Either size is good for streaming from the YouTube website; the mobile size will be easier to watch for people with slower internet connections.
Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The size of the movie file in megabytes.
  • You can limit who can view the movie by making selecting “Make this movie private.”
  • Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to the YouTube website.
  • After the movie has been uploaded to YouTube, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to YouTube.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends.
  • To visit your movie’s webpage, click Visit.
  • To notify your friends of the new movie you’ve published, click “Tell a friend.”

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to YouTube, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Publishing directly to your .Mac Web Gallery:

To share your movies over the Internet, you can publish your iMovie projects directly to your .Mac Web Gallery. After you publish a movie, send its internet address to your friends and family so they can view it.

To publish to your .Mac Web Gallery, you must have an active .Mac account. If you don’t already have a .Mac account, you can sign up for one at the .Mac or MobileMe website.

To publish to your .Mac Web Gallery:

Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > .Mac Web Gallery.

In the “Publish to .Mac” window, fill in the fields:

  • Title: The title of your movie.
  • Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  • Select one or more movie sizes to publish. The dimensions of the finished movies are shown on the right side of the table.
  • Mobile size is recommended for most purposes; the larger sizes may be difficult to watch for people who have slow Internet connections.

If the larger sizes are unavailable, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The file size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Choose an option from the “Viewable by” pop-up menu to set password protection for your movie, depending on whether you want it to be publicly viewable or accessible by only specific people.
  • Everyone: Makes the movie publicly accessible by any visitor to your .Mac Web Gallery.
  • Only me: Requires your .Mac user name and password in order for you to see the movie. Sharing your user name and password with others is not recommended.
  • Edit names and passwords: Allows you to create user names and passwords that you can provide to others whom you want to be able to access the movie. After selecting this option, click the Add (+) button in the bottom-left corner of the window and then type a user name. Press the Tab key, and then type the password you want to associate with the user name. User names and passwords must be between four and twenty characters long and can include only letters (a through z), digits (0 through 9), the underscore (_) or a period (.), but not more than a single period can be used at the end. Any Web Gallery movies available to this user will be listed to the right of the password. Click OK, and then select the user name from the “Viewable by” pop-up menu.
  • Select “Hide movie on Web Gallery homepage” if you do not want the movie to appear on the homepage of your .Mac Web Gallery.
  • Select “Allow movie to be downloaded” if you want viewers to be able to download copies of your movie.
  • Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to your .Mac Web Gallery. After the movie has been uploaded to .Mac, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to .Mac.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends and family.
  • To visit your movie’s webpage, click Visit.
  • To notify your friends and family of the new movie you’ve published, click “Tell a friend.”
  • If you want to remove your movie from .Mac, choose Share > “Remove from .Mac.”

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to .Mac, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. The old version of the movie is deleted and replaced by the new one when you publish it again by choosing Edit > “Republish to .Mac Web Gallery.”

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to a folder in the Finder.


Watching:


Watching your movies on Apple TV:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects on your Apple TV, you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. The large size movie is best for viewing on Apple TV.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > “Share Project with iTunes.”
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render. If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render. The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:
  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In iTunes, click Movies to see your movie and broadcast it through Apple TV.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your movies on your iPod:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects on your iPod (or download it to you iPhone), you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. The medium sized movie is best for viewing on your iPod.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > “Share Project with iTunes.”
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render.
  • If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.
  • The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies.
  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In iTunes, click Movies to see your movie and download it to your iPod or iPhone.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your video on your iPhone:

There are two ways to view an iMovie project on your iPhone:

  • Send it to iTunes and download it just as you do for an iPod.
  • Publish it to your .Mac Web Gallery.

To learn how to send a movie to iTunes for downloading to your iPhone, see the instructions for watching your movie on your iPod.

Watching your movies on your iPod:

To publish to .Mac, you must have an active .Mac account. If you don’t already have a .Mac account, you can sign up for one at the .Mac website.

To publish your video to the .Mac Web Gallery and watch it on your iPhone:

  1. Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > .Mac Web Gallery.
  2. In the Publish to .Mac window, fill in the fields: Page Title: The title of your movie. Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  3. Select the tiny and mobile sizes to publish. Your iPhone uses either of these sizes, depending on how you’re connected.
  4. Select “Allow movies to be downloaded” if you want viewers to be able to download copies of your movie.
  5. You can limit who can view the movie by selecting “Show project on Web Gallery home page.”
  6. Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to your .Mac Web Gallery. After the movie has been uploaded to .Mac, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to .Mac.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends and family.
  7. To find out the URL (web address) for the movies published to your .Mac Web Gallery, click Visit, and then write down the URL.
  8. Using Safari on your iPhone, navigate to the URL for your movies.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to your .Mac Web Gallery.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to .Mac, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. The old version of the movie is deleted and replaced by new ones when you publish it again by choosing Edit > “Republish to .Mac Web Gallery.”

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your movies in Front Row:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects in Front Row, you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. You’ll be able to play any of these sizes in Front Row.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > iTunes.
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render.

If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In Front Row, select Videos, and then select Movies to find the movies you created in iMovie.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Exporting:

Export Settings:

You can customize the export settings when you export a movie to QuickTime.

To customize these settings:

  1. Choose File > Export.
  2. Choose Expert Settings from the Formats pop-up menu.
  3. Click the Export button.
  4. Choose Movie to QuickTime Movie from the Export pop-up menu.
  5. Click the Options button.
  6. Click the Settings button in the Video panel to see the compression, frames per second (frame rate), and key frame settings.
  7. Click the Size button in the Video panel to customize the frame size.

In general, choose settings that give you the best trade-off between file size and video playback quality. Before you use the Expert Settings option, consider the following:

Codec options:

  • MPEG-4 is the standard codec (compressor/decompressor) used for Internet movies. To get the MPEG-4 codec option, you must have QuickTime 6 or later.
  • For movies that will be viewed on earlier computer systems, you may want to use the Motion JPEG codec.
  • The Sorensen codec is good for viewing movies on later systems. For earlier systems, use Cinepak or Motion JPEG.

Frame size, Keyframes, and Frame rate:

  1. Pick a movie frame size first. Primarily, frame size determines the movie’s file size.
  2. Set the number of key frames next. If the number of key frames is high, the movie will play back at higher quality, but the file size will be larger. With lower keyframe numbers, the video quality may be lower, but the file size will be smaller.
  3. Set the frame rate last. You may get choppy video playback if you set the frame rate to less than 12 frames per second. But higher frame rates create larger file sizes.

Exporting a movie from iMovie HD to iPod:

Want to put your own movies on your iPod? You can with iMovie HD and an iPod with video compatibility (currently Fifth Generation iPod). You also need to have QuickTime 7.0.3 or later and iTunes 6 or later installed—they’re both free downloads! If you’re not sure what iPod model you have, click here.

  • Find out which version of QuickTime you have here or download the latest version from here.
  • Find out which version of iTunes you have here or download the latest version from here.
  • You can also download and install the latest iMovie, QuickTime, and iTunes updates using Software Update.

To export a movie from iMovie HD 6 to your iPod:

  1. In iMovie HD 6, open the movie you want to transfer.
  2. If you only want to transfer a portion of your movie, select the clips you want to transfer in the timeline viewer.
  3. From the Share menu, choose iPod.
  4. Click to select the “Share selected clips only” checkbox if you only want to share clips you selected.
  5. Click Share.
  6. iMovie HD compresses your movie and saves it to your iTunes library. The time it takes to save the movie depends on the movie’s length.
  7. Open iTunes 6.0 or later, and then sync with your iPod.
  8. For more information about syncing, see the documentation that came with your video-compatible iPod.

To export a movie from iMovie HD 5 to your iPod:

  • Open iMovie HD and create a movie, or open an existing movie in the application.
  • From the File menu, choose Share.
  • Click the QuickTime tab.
  • From the Compress movie for pop-up menu, choose Expert Settings.

  • Click Share.
  • From the Export pop-up menu in the resulting dialog, choose Movie to iPod (320X240).

  • Click Save to start the export process. Depending on the length of your movie, this can take a long time. iMovie uses H.264 compression to create the movie file (video iPod format), which will appear on your hard disk in the location you saved it when iMovie is done. Open the new file in QuickTime Player and play it to make sure it looks as you expect.

  • Open iTunes 6 and drag your new movie file icon to the iTunes library in the Source list. To learn how to browse and view videos in iTunes, click here. Note: iTunes won’t let you drag the movie to the Video playlist, but once you drag it to the Library, it will automatically appear in the Video playlist. You can also drag the video file to a playlist you create or directly to the iPod in the Source list.

  • To copy the movie onto a Fifth Generation iPod, either sync it with your iPod or manually copy it. To learn how to sync video to your iPod click here, check out the iPod tutorial, or check the Features Guide that came with your iPod.

Additional Information:

A note about copyright: This software may be used to reproduce materials. It is licensed to you only for reproduction of non-copyrighted materials, materials in which you own the copyright, or materials you are authorized or legally permitted to reproduce. If you are uncertain about your right to copy any material, you should contact your legal advisor.

Exporting your movie for viewing in PAL or NTSC format:

When you first create a new project in iMovie HD, you can select a video format for the project. The video and images you later add to the iMovie are converted to this format. However, if you need to format your movie to be viewed on a VCR or DVD player that uses another format, you can use the expert export options to convert your movie.

NTSC is a format commonly used in North America and Japan. PAL is a format commonly used by devices in Europe. There are also different versions of these two formats, such as DVCPRO-PAL and DVCPRO50-NTSC, so determine the precise format you need before exporting.

To export a movie in NTSC or PAL format:

  1. Choose Share > QuickTime.
  2. Choose Expert Settings from the “Compress movie for” pop-up menu, and then click Share.
  3. Type a name for your movie and choose where you want to save it.
  4. Choose “Movie to QuickTime Movie” from the Export pop-up menu, and then click Options.
  5. In the Video pane, click Settings to open the Compression Settings dialog.
  6. Choose a format from the pop-up menu (DV-PAL or DVCPRO-PAL for Europe, DV-NTSC or DVCPRO-NTSC for North America and Japan).
  7. Choose a value from the Frames Rate pop-up menu (25 for PAL and 29.97 for NTSC)
  8. Drag the Quality slider to the desired quality. Best is recommended.
  9. Click OK.
  10. Click Size to open the Export Size Settings dialog, and then click “Use custom size.”
  11. Type a value in the Width field (720 for both PAL and NTSC) and in the Height field (576 for PAL and 480 for NTSC), and then click OK.
  12. Click Settings in the Sound pane.
  13. Choose Stereo (L R) from the Channels pop-up menu in the Sound Settings dialog.
  14. Choose 48.000 from the kHz pop-up menu (or type it in the Rate field).
  15. Choose 16 from the “Sample size” pop-up menu, and then click OK.
  16. Click OK in the Movie Settings dialog.
  17. Click Save.

Exporting movies with expert settings:

The export options provided in iMovie HD will work in most cases if you plan to use a QuickTime format. If you want to use a different format, such as MPEG-4, and have some experience with custom settings, you can create your own export settings.

For example, if you want to share your movie with someone who uses an older Windows computer, you can export your movie as an image sequence, then choose the JPEG option.

iMovie HD supports exporting in the following file formats:

  1. 3G
  2. AVI
  3. BMP
  4. DV Stream
  5. FLC
  6. Hinted Movie
  7. Image Sequence
  8. MPEG-4
  9. Picture
  10. QuickTime Movie
  11. Sound to AIFF
  12. Sound to System 7 Sound
  13. Sound to Wave
  14. Sound to uLaw

iMovie also supports many video, audio, streaming, and compatibility options associated with the compression of these file formats. For example, when saving your movie as a QuickTime movie, you can choose among video compression formats such as Cinepak, DV-PAL, DV/DVCPRO -NTSC, JPEG 2000, MPEG-4 Video, Planar RGB, PNG, Sorenson Video, TGA, and more.

iMovie also supports many sound compression formats, such as 24-bit Integer, 32-bit Integer, 64-bit integer, Alaw 2:1, AMR NarrowBand, IMA 4:1, MACE 3:1, Qualcomm PureVoice, and many more.

So if you’re fairly expert at understanding video file formats and compression characteristics, use the expert settings to set up your files the way you want.

To export your movie with expert settings:

  1. Choose File > Export.
  2. Choose Expert Settings from the “Compress movie for” pop-up menu, and then click Share.
  3. Choose the type of export format you want, and then click Options.
  4. Set the compression format (known as a “codec”). Sorenson Video, DV-PAL, and Motion JPEG A are examples of codecs. Depending on the type of export you choose (such as “Sound to AIFF” or “MPEG-4”), you see different codecs and compression options.
  5. Set the frame size. This setting affects the overall file size of your movie. Better quality creates a larger file size.
  6. Set the key frame number. A low number (such as every ten frames) creates a better-quality movie with a larger file size.
  7. Set the frame rate last. You may get choppy-looking video playback if you set the frame rate to less than about 12 frames per second.

Exporting a movie to iDVD:

Once your movie is ready for viewing, iMovie HD can automatically export it to an iDVD project that you can burn on a DVD. You can then view your DVD on a television using a DVD player or on your computer screen using the Apple DVD Player.

Note: Before you export your movie to iDVD, you can add chapter markers to it so that viewers can quickly review different sections of the movie on DVD. If you’ve added chapter markers, they are exported with your movie, and you can use them to add scene selection menus to your iDVD project.

Not all computers support iDVD. See your computer’s manual to find out if your computer does.

To export your movie to iDVD:

  1. Choose Share > iDVD.
  2. Click the “Share selected clips only” checkbox if you only want to share clips you selected.
  3. Click Share.

iDVD opens and your movie appears in a new project in iDVD.

For more information about using iDVD, choose Help > iDVD Help when iDVD is open.

Tip: You can automatically export video to iDVD from your camcorder using the Magic iMovie feature.

Exporting your movie for viewing on Apple TV:

You can watch your movie on Apple TV by exporting it from iMovie HD to your iTunes library, and then using iTunes to stream the movie to Apple TV or sync your Apple TV with your iTunes library.

IMPORTANT: To export a movie for viewing on Apple TV, you must have QuickTime 7.1.5 or later and iTunes 7.1 or later installed on your computer. For the latest versions of these applications, open System Preferences, click Software Update, and then click Check Now.

Before following these instructions, make sure you set up Apple TV for streaming or syncing video. For more information, see the documentation that came with Apple TV.

If you export a movie for viewing on Apple TV, you won’t be able to watch it on an iPod. To learn how to transfer your movie to an iPod, see Related Topics below.

To export your movie for viewing on Apple TV:

  1. In iMovie HD, open the movie you want to export.
  2. Choose Share > QuickTime.
  3. Choose Expert Settings from the “Compress movie for” pop-up menu.
  4. Click Share.
  5. In the “Save exported file as” window, choose “Movie to Apple TV” from the Export pop-up menu.
  6. Choose a location for the movie you’re exporting from the Where pop-up menu, and then click Save.
  7. Open iTunes.
  8. Drag your exported movie to the iTunes Movies library.
  9. Use Apple TV to view your movie.

For more information, see iTunes Help or the documentation that came with Apple TV.

IMPORTANT: Do not delete the exported file from the location you chose in step 6 unless you have iTunes set up to copy files to the iTunes Music folder when you add them to iTunes. To see if this option is turned on, open iTunes, choose iTunes > Preferences, click Advanced, and then click the General tab. If the “Copy files to iTunes Music folder when adding to library” checkbox is selected, you can delete the exported file from the location you chose in step 6.

Customizing your QuickTime export:

If you want to set your own QuickTime settings for your exported iMovie projects, use the QuickTime expert export settings.

To use the expert QuickTime settings:

  1. Select your project in the Project Library and choose Share > Export Using QuickTime.
  2. Type a name for the movie in the Save As field and choose a location to save the file from the Where pop-up menu.
  3. Make your selections for format, compression, and other variables, and then click Save.

Exporting your movies to a Finder folder:

When you share your project with iTunes or the Media Browser, iMovie renders it and makes the rendered versions accessible only through iTunes or the iLife Media Browser.

If you make further edits to your project after you’ve prepared it for sharing or sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie in the iTunes or the iLife Media Browser are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the current version of your movie before you edit it, or if you simply want to create a copy you can access on your desktop or any Finder folder, you need to export it as a movie. Exported movies are identical to the movies that are rendered when you share with iTunes or the Media Browser, but they are accessible through the Finder and can be used by any application that doesn’t have access to movies in iTunes or the Media Browser, such as Mail.

When you export your movie, iMovie gives you four size options:

  • Tiny: Always 176 by 144 pixels.
  • Mobile: Always 480 by 272 pixels.
  • Medium: Varies in size from 640 by 480 pixels (standard aspect ratio) to 640 by 360 pixels (widescreen), depending on the size of the media in your project.
  • Large: Always 960 by 540 pixels (widescreen). No large size is rendered if your original video isn’t high definition (HD).

If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device.

Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The size of the movie file in megabytes.

To export your project to the Finder:

  1. Choose Share > “Export Movie.”
  2. Type a name for the movie in the Export As field, and then choose the location where you want to save it in the Where pop-up menu.
  3. Select the size that best matches what you’ll be using the video for.
  4. Click Export.
  5. To find your exported movie, navigate to the folder that you chose in the Where pop-up menu.

Exporting a presentation from Keynote to iMovie:

With Keynote you can export your presentation to a number of file formats.

Follow these steps to create a file that you can use in iMovie:

  1. Open your presentation in Keynote
  2. Choose File > Export.
  3. Select QuickTime as the file format.
  4. Select “Fixed Timing” for playback. Do not select the manual advance option; the resulting file may not import into iMovie.
  5. Select “Full Quality Large” for the format setting.
  6. Click Next.
  7. Name and save your movie.

Follow these steps to import this file into iMovie:

  1. Open iMovie
  2. Choose File > Import Movies.
  3. Locate your movie, saved in step 7 above.
  4. Click Import.

Tip: You can also export your presentation from Keynote to other iLife applications by selecting File > Send To… in Keynote.

…more iMovie Tips ?

Using iMovie

Customizing:

Using analog/FireWire converter devices with iMovie:

You can convert video in 8 mm, Hi8, VHS, or SVHS format to digital video (DV) format, using a special converter box (sometimes referred to as AV adapters), such as the Sony DVMC-DA2 or the Synchrotech Formac Studio.
If you use a converter to import non-DV video, you can’t control your camera or deck with iMovie. However, you can manually control the camera to import video clips and use all of iMovie’s editing features, then export your video through the converter back to your video recorder or camera.

A converter of this kind will generally have standard S-video and RCA input/output ports for video and audio, and a FireWire or iLink (IEEE 1394) input/output port. Make sure you have the appropriate cables for your configuration.

To ensure compatibility with third-party video devices, check the iLife Camcorder Compatibility page, the Apple Store, and/or vendor websites for compatibility information.

For more information, check the documentation that came with your converter.

Capturing Analog Video From a Converter Box Into iMovie:

Follow these steps to import video from an analog-to-FireWire converter device.
While this specific order may not be necessary with all converters, it will help ensure proper initialization between the hardware and software:

  1. Start up your computer, turn on the converter box, and connect the computer to the converter with a FireWire cable.
  2. Connect the video cable from the video output of the video source (for example, a VCR or video camera) to the analog video input of the converter box. A video camera should be in playback or VTR mode. Connect the audio source, too.
  3. The converter box will typically have a switch or button that tells the device which direction to convert the video, analog to DV or DV to analog. For capturing analog video, you will want to press the button labeled “Analog In” or something similar.
  4. Connect a 4-to-6 pin FireWire cable from the DV out port on the converter box (sometimes labeled FireWire, IEEE 1394, or iLink with Sony devices) to a FireWire port on the computer.
  5. Open the iMovie application program.
  6. Make sure the Mode Switch under the iMovie monitor is set to Camera Mode, as shown here:
  7. Some converter boxes have a green status light, to indicate a good connection. If this light is amber or red at this point, try turning the device off for several seconds and then back on again. You may also try quitting and opening iMovie again.
  8. Press play on the VCR or analog camera. You should see the video signal in the iMovie monitor. If you have speakers or headphones connected to the VCR you can monitor the audio.
  9. Use the controls on the video source to manually cue the video tape to the desired spot, and click Import in iMovie. iMovie will create a new clip for about every nine minutes of video. You can join all the clips later by dragging them into the timeline.

Sending Video From iMovie to the Converter Box:

Follow these steps to export video to an analog-to-FireWire converter box.
While this specific order may not be necessary with all converters, it will help ensure proper initialization between the hardware and software:

  1. Start up your computer, turn on the converter box, and connect the computer to the converter with a FireWire cable.
  2. Connect the video cable from the video output of the source (for example, a VCR or video camera) to the analog video input of the converter box. A video camera should be in playback or VTR mode. Connect the audio source, too.
  3. The converter box will typically have a switch or button which tells the device which direction to convert the video, analog to DV or DV to analog. For exporting analog video, you will want to press the button labeled “Analog In” or something similar.
  4. Connect a 4-to-6 pin FireWire cable from the DV out port on the converter box (sometimes labeled FireWire, IEEE 1394, or iLink with Sony devices) to a FireWire port on the computer.
  5. Open the iMovie application program.
  6. From the iMovie menu, choose Preferences (or File menu in Mac OS 9).
  7. Click the Advanced tab.
  8. Make sure the checkbox for “Video Play Through to Camera” is selected.
  9. Choose Export Movie from the File menu, or press Command-E on the keyboard.
  10. In the Export Movie window, select the pop-up menu for “Export to Camera”, even if you’re exporting to a VCR through the converter.
  11. Press record on the VCR and click Export in iMovie.
  12. When finished, press the stop button on the VCR and Stop in the iMovie monitor.


Publishing:

Publishing directly to YouTube:

You can publish your iMovie project directly to the YouTube website. YouTube is an independent website that freely hosts videos by its community members. To post to YouTube, you must have a YouTube account.

To publish to YouTube:

  • Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > YouTube.
  • Choose your account in the Account pop-up menu.
  • If you don’t have a YouTube account, click Add to be guided through the account creation process on the YouTube website.
  • Choose a category from the pop-up menu for the video to be categorized on the YouTube website.
  • Fill in the following fields:
  • Title: The name of your movie.
  • Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  • Tags: Keywords that viewers can use to search for and find your movie.
  • Select the mobile or medium size for your movie.

If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Either size is good for streaming from the YouTube website; the mobile size will be easier to watch for people with slower internet connections.
Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The size of the movie file in megabytes.
  • You can limit who can view the movie by making selecting “Make this movie private.”
  • Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to the YouTube website.
  • After the movie has been uploaded to YouTube, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to YouTube.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends.
  • To visit your movie’s webpage, click Visit.
  • To notify your friends of the new movie you’ve published, click “Tell a friend.”

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to YouTube, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Publishing directly to your .Mac Web Gallery:

To share your movies over the Internet, you can publish your iMovie projects directly to your .Mac Web Gallery. After you publish a movie, send its internet address to your friends and family so they can view it.

To publish to your .Mac Web Gallery, you must have an active .Mac account. If you don’t already have a .Mac account, you can sign up for one at the .Mac or MobileMe website.

To publish to your .Mac Web Gallery:

Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > .Mac Web Gallery.

In the “Publish to .Mac” window, fill in the fields:

  • Title: The title of your movie.
  • Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  • Select one or more movie sizes to publish. The dimensions of the finished movies are shown on the right side of the table.
  • Mobile size is recommended for most purposes; the larger sizes may be difficult to watch for people who have slow Internet connections.

If the larger sizes are unavailable, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The file size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Choose an option from the “Viewable by” pop-up menu to set password protection for your movie, depending on whether you want it to be publicly viewable or accessible by only specific people.
  • Everyone: Makes the movie publicly accessible by any visitor to your .Mac Web Gallery.
  • Only me: Requires your .Mac user name and password in order for you to see the movie. Sharing your user name and password with others is not recommended.
  • Edit names and passwords: Allows you to create user names and passwords that you can provide to others whom you want to be able to access the movie. After selecting this option, click the Add (+) button in the bottom-left corner of the window and then type a user name. Press the Tab key, and then type the password you want to associate with the user name. User names and passwords must be between four and twenty characters long and can include only letters (a through z), digits (0 through 9), the underscore (_) or a period (.), but not more than a single period can be used at the end. Any Web Gallery movies available to this user will be listed to the right of the password. Click OK, and then select the user name from the “Viewable by” pop-up menu.
  • Select “Hide movie on Web Gallery homepage” if you do not want the movie to appear on the homepage of your .Mac Web Gallery.
  • Select “Allow movie to be downloaded” if you want viewers to be able to download copies of your movie.
  • Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to your .Mac Web Gallery. After the movie has been uploaded to .Mac, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to .Mac.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends and family.
  • To visit your movie’s webpage, click Visit.
  • To notify your friends and family of the new movie you’ve published, click “Tell a friend.”
  • If you want to remove your movie from .Mac, choose Share > “Remove from .Mac.”

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to .Mac, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. The old version of the movie is deleted and replaced by the new one when you publish it again by choosing Edit > “Republish to .Mac Web Gallery.”

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to a folder in the Finder.


Watching:


Watching your movies on Apple TV:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects on your Apple TV, you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. The large size movie is best for viewing on Apple TV.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > “Share Project with iTunes.”
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render. If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render. The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:
  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In iTunes, click Movies to see your movie and broadcast it through Apple TV.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your movies on your iPod:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects on your iPod (or download it to you iPhone), you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. The medium sized movie is best for viewing on your iPod.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > “Share Project with iTunes.”
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render.
  • If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.
  • The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies.
  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In iTunes, click Movies to see your movie and download it to your iPod or iPhone.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your video on your iPhone:

There are two ways to view an iMovie project on your iPhone:

  • Send it to iTunes and download it just as you do for an iPod.
  • Publish it to your .Mac Web Gallery.

To learn how to send a movie to iTunes for downloading to your iPhone, see the instructions for watching your movie on your iPod.

Watching your movies on your iPod:

To publish to .Mac, you must have an active .Mac account. If you don’t already have a .Mac account, you can sign up for one at the .Mac website.

To publish your video to the .Mac Web Gallery and watch it on your iPhone:

  1. Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > .Mac Web Gallery.
  2. In the Publish to .Mac window, fill in the fields: Page Title: The title of your movie. Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  3. Select the tiny and mobile sizes to publish. Your iPhone uses either of these sizes, depending on how you’re connected.
  4. Select “Allow movies to be downloaded” if you want viewers to be able to download copies of your movie.
  5. You can limit who can view the movie by selecting “Show project on Web Gallery home page.”
  6. Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to your .Mac Web Gallery. After the movie has been uploaded to .Mac, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to .Mac.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends and family.
  7. To find out the URL (web address) for the movies published to your .Mac Web Gallery, click Visit, and then write down the URL.
  8. Using Safari on your iPhone, navigate to the URL for your movies.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to your .Mac Web Gallery.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to .Mac, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. The old version of the movie is deleted and replaced by new ones when you publish it again by choosing Edit > “Republish to .Mac Web Gallery.”

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your movies in Front Row:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects in Front Row, you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. You’ll be able to play any of these sizes in Front Row.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > iTunes.
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render.

If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In Front Row, select Videos, and then select Movies to find the movies you created in iMovie.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Exporting:

Export Settings:You can customize the export settings when you export a movie to QuickTime.

To customize these settings:

  1. Choose File > Export.
  2. Choose Expert Settings from the Formats pop-up menu.
  3. Click the Export button.
  4. Choose Movie to QuickTime Movie from the Export pop-up menu.
  5. Click the Options button.
  6. Click the Settings button in the Video panel to see the compression, frames per second (frame rate), and key frame settings.
  7. Click the Size button in the Video panel to customize the frame size.

In general, choose settings that give you the best trade-off between file size and video playback quality. Before you use the Expert Settings option, consider the following:

Codec options:

  • MPEG-4 is the standard codec (compressor/decompressor) used for Internet movies. To get the MPEG-4 codec option, you must have QuickTime 6 or later.
  • For movies that will be viewed on earlier computer systems, you may want to use the Motion JPEG codec.
  • The Sorensen codec is good for viewing movies on later systems. For earlier systems, use Cinepak or Motion JPEG.

Frame size, Keyframes, and Frame rate:

  1. Pick a movie frame size first. Primarily, frame size determines the movie’s file size.
  2. Set the number of key frames next. If the number of key frames is high, the movie will play back at higher quality, but the file size will be larger. With lower keyframe numbers, the video quality may be lower, but the file size will be smaller.
  3. Set the frame rate last. You may get choppy video playback if you set the frame rate to less than 12 frames per second. But higher frame rates create larger file sizes.

Exporting a movie from iMovie HD to iPod:

Want to put your own movies on your iPod? You can with iMovie HD and an iPod with video compatibility (currently Fifth Generation iPod). You also need to have QuickTime 7.0.3 or later and iTunes 6 or later installed—they’re both free downloads! If you’re not sure what iPod model you have, click here.

  • Find out which version of QuickTime you have here or download the latest version from here.
  • Find out which version of iTunes you have here or download the latest version from here.
  • You can also download and install the latest iMovie, QuickTime, and iTunes updates using Software Update.

To export a movie from iMovie HD 6 to your iPod:

  1. In iMovie HD 6, open the movie you want to transfer.
  2. If you only want to transfer a portion of your movie, select the clips you want to transfer in the timeline viewer.
  3. From the Share menu, choose iPod.
  4. Click to select the “Share selected clips only” checkbox if you only want to share clips you selected.
  5. Click Share.
  6. iMovie HD compresses your movie and saves it to your iTunes library. The time it takes to save the movie depends on the movie’s length.
  7. Open iTunes 6.0 or later, and then sync with your iPod.
  8. For more information about syncing, see the documentation that came with your video-compatible iPod.

To export a movie from iMovie HD 5 to your iPod:

  • Open iMovie HD and create a movie, or open an existing movie in the application.
  • From the File menu, choose Share.
  • Click the QuickTime tab.
  • From the Compress movie for pop-up menu, choose Expert Settings.

  • Click Share.
  • From the Export pop-up menu in the resulting dialog, choose Movie to iPod (320X240).

  • Click Save to start the export process. Depending on the length of your movie, this can take a long time. iMovie uses H.264 compression to create the movie file (video iPod format), which will appear on your hard disk in the location you saved it when iMovie is done. Open the new file in QuickTime Player and play it to make sure it looks as you expect.

  • Open iTunes 6 and drag your new movie file icon to the iTunes library in the Source list. To learn how to browse and view videos in iTunes, click here. Note: iTunes won’t let you drag the movie to the Video playlist, but once you drag it to the Library, it will automatically appear in the Video playlist. You can also drag the video file to a playlist you create or directly to the iPod in the Source list.

  • To copy the movie onto a Fifth Generation iPod, either sync it with your iPod or manually copy it. To learn how to sync video to your iPod click here, check out the iPod tutorial, or check the Features Guide that came with your iPod.

Additional Information:

A note about copyright: This software may be used to reproduce materials. It is licensed to you only for reproduction of non-copyrighted materials, materials in which you own the copyright, or materials you are authorized or legally permitted to reproduce. If you are uncertain about your right to copy any material, you should contact your legal advisor.

Exporting your movie for viewing in PAL or NTSC format:

When you first create a new project in iMovie HD, you can select a video format for the project. The video and images you later add to the iMovie are converted to this format. However, if you need to format your movie to be viewed on a VCR or DVD player that uses another format, you can use the expert export options to convert your movie.

NTSC is a format commonly used in North America and Japan. PAL is a format commonly used by devices in Europe. There are also different versions of these two formats, such as DVCPRO-PAL and DVCPRO50-NTSC, so determine the precise format you need before exporting.

To export a movie in NTSC or PAL format:

  1. Choose Share > QuickTime.
  2. Choose Expert Settings from the “Compress movie for” pop-up menu, and then click Share.
  3. Type a name for your movie and choose where you want to save it.
  4. Choose “Movie to QuickTime Movie” from the Export pop-up menu, and then click Options.
  5. In the Video pane, click Settings to open the Compression Settings dialog.
  6. Choose a format from the pop-up menu (DV-PAL or DVCPRO-PAL for Europe, DV-NTSC or DVCPRO-NTSC for North America and Japan).
  7. Choose a value from the Frames Rate pop-up menu (25 for PAL and 29.97 for NTSC)
  8. Drag the Quality slider to the desired quality. Best is recommended.
  9. Click OK.
  10. Click Size to open the Export Size Settings dialog, and then click “Use custom size.”
  11. Type a value in the Width field (720 for both PAL and NTSC) and in the Height field (576 for PAL and 480 for NTSC), and then click OK.
  12. Click Settings in the Sound pane.
  13. Choose Stereo (L R) from the Channels pop-up menu in the Sound Settings dialog.
  14. Choose 48.000 from the kHz pop-up menu (or type it in the Rate field).
  15. Choose 16 from the “Sample size” pop-up menu, and then click OK.
  16. Click OK in the Movie Settings dialog.
  17. Click Save.

Exporting movies with expert settings:

The export options provided in iMovie HD will work in most cases if you plan to use a QuickTime format. If you want to use a different format, such as MPEG-4, and have some experience with custom settings, you can create your own export settings.

For example, if you want to share your movie with someone who uses an older Windows computer, you can export your movie as an image sequence, then choose the JPEG option.

iMovie HD supports exporting in the following file formats:

  1. 3G
  2. AVI
  3. BMP
  4. DV Stream
  5. FLC
  6. Hinted Movie
  7. Image Sequence
  8. MPEG-4
  9. Picture
  10. QuickTime Movie
  11. Sound to AIFF
  12. Sound to System 7 Sound
  13. Sound to Wave
  14. Sound to uLaw

iMovie also supports many video, audio, streaming, and compatibility options associated with the compression of these file formats. For example, when saving your movie as a QuickTime movie, you can choose among video compression formats such as Cinepak, DV-PAL, DV/DVCPRO -NTSC, JPEG 2000, MPEG-4 Video, Planar RGB, PNG, Sorenson Video, TGA, and more.

iMovie also supports many sound compression formats, such as 24-bit Integer, 32-bit Integer, 64-bit integer, Alaw 2:1, AMR NarrowBand, IMA 4:1, MACE 3:1, Qualcomm PureVoice, and many more.

So if you’re fairly expert at understanding video file formats and compression characteristics, use the expert settings to set up your files the way you want.

To export your movie with expert settings:

  1. Choose File > Export.
  2. Choose Expert Settings from the “Compress movie for” pop-up menu, and then click Share.
  3. Choose the type of export format you want, and then click Options.
  4. Set the compression format (known as a “codec”). Sorenson Video, DV-PAL, and Motion JPEG A are examples of codecs. Depending on the type of export you choose (such as “Sound to AIFF” or “MPEG-4”), you see different codecs and compression options.
  5. Set the frame size. This setting affects the overall file size of your movie. Better quality creates a larger file size.
  6. Set the key frame number. A low number (such as every ten frames) creates a better-quality movie with a larger file size.
  7. Set the frame rate last. You may get choppy-looking video playback if you set the frame rate to less than about 12 frames per second.

Exporting a movie to iDVD:

Once your movie is ready for viewing, iMovie HD can automatically export it to an iDVD project that you can burn on a DVD. You can then view your DVD on a television using a DVD player or on your computer screen using the Apple DVD Player.

Note: Before you export your movie to iDVD, you can add chapter markers to it so that viewers can quickly review different sections of the movie on DVD. If you’ve added chapter markers, they are exported with your movie, and you can use them to add scene selection menus to your iDVD project.

Not all computers support iDVD. See your computer’s manual to find out if your computer does.

To export your movie to iDVD:

  1. Choose Share > iDVD.
  2. Click the “Share selected clips only” checkbox if you only want to share clips you selected.
  3. Click Share.

iDVD opens and your movie appears in a new project in iDVD.

For more information about using iDVD, choose Help > iDVD Help when iDVD is open.

Tip: You can automatically export video to iDVD from your camcorder using the Magic iMovie feature.

Exporting your movie for viewing on Apple TV:

You can watch your movie on Apple TV by exporting it from iMovie HD to your iTunes library, and then using iTunes to stream the movie to Apple TV or sync your Apple TV with your iTunes library.

IMPORTANT: To export a movie for viewing on Apple TV, you must have QuickTime 7.1.5 or later and iTunes 7.1 or later installed on your computer. For the latest versions of these applications, open System Preferences, click Software Update, and then click Check Now.

Before following these instructions, make sure you set up Apple TV for streaming or syncing video. For more information, see the documentation that came with Apple TV.

If you export a movie for viewing on Apple TV, you won’t be able to watch it on an iPod. To learn how to transfer your movie to an iPod, see Related Topics below.

To export your movie for viewing on Apple TV:

  1. In iMovie HD, open the movie you want to export.
  2. Choose Share > QuickTime.
  3. Choose Expert Settings from the “Compress movie for” pop-up menu.
  4. Click Share.
  5. In the “Save exported file as” window, choose “Movie to Apple TV” from the Export pop-up menu.
  6. Choose a location for the movie you’re exporting from the Where pop-up menu, and then click Save.
  7. Open iTunes.
  8. Drag your exported movie to the iTunes Movies library.
  9. Use Apple TV to view your movie.

For more information, see iTunes Help or the documentation that came with Apple TV.

IMPORTANT: Do not delete the exported file from the location you chose in step 6 unless you have iTunes set up to copy files to the iTunes Music folder when you add them to iTunes. To see if this option is turned on, open iTunes, choose iTunes > Preferences, click Advanced, and then click the General tab. If the “Copy files to iTunes Music folder when adding to library” checkbox is selected, you can delete the exported file from the location you chose in step 6.

Customizing your QuickTime export:

If you want to set your own QuickTime settings for your exported iMovie projects, use the QuickTime expert export settings.

To use the expert QuickTime settings:

  1. Select your project in the Project Library and choose Share > Export Using QuickTime.
  2. Type a name for the movie in the Save As field and choose a location to save the file from the Where pop-up menu.
  3. Make your selections for format, compression, and other variables, and then click Save.

Exporting your movies to a Finder folder:

When you share your project with iTunes or the Media Browser, iMovie renders it and makes the rendered versions accessible only through iTunes or the iLife Media Browser.

If you make further edits to your project after you’ve prepared it for sharing or sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie in the iTunes or the iLife Media Browser are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the current version of your movie before you edit it, or if you simply want to create a copy you can access on your desktop or any Finder folder, you need to export it as a movie. Exported movies are identical to the movies that are rendered when you share with iTunes or the Media Browser, but they are accessible through the Finder and can be used by any application that doesn’t have access to movies in iTunes or the Media Browser, such as Mail.

When you export your movie, iMovie gives you four size options:

  • Tiny: Always 176 by 144 pixels.
  • Mobile: Always 480 by 272 pixels.
  • Medium: Varies in size from 640 by 480 pixels (standard aspect ratio) to 640 by 360 pixels (widescreen), depending on the size of the media in your project.
  • Large: Always 960 by 540 pixels (widescreen). No large size is rendered if your original video isn’t high definition (HD).

If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device.

Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The size of the movie file in megabytes.

To export your project to the Finder:

  1. Choose Share > “Export Movie.”
  2. Type a name for the movie in the Export As field, and then choose the location where you want to save it in the Where pop-up menu.
  3. Select the size that best matches what you’ll be using the video for.
  4. Click Export.
  5. To find your exported movie, navigate to the folder that you chose in the Where pop-up menu.

Exporting a presentation from Keynote to iMovie:

With Keynote you can export your presentation to a number of file formats.

Follow these steps to create a file that you can use in iMovie:

  1. Open your presentation in Keynote
  2. Choose File > Export.
  3. Select QuickTime as the file format.
  4. Select “Fixed Timing” for playback. Do not select the manual advance option; the resulting file may not import into iMovie.
  5. Select “Full Quality Large” for the format setting.
  6. Click Next.
  7. Name and save your movie.

Follow these steps to import this file into iMovie:

  1. Open iMovie
  2. Choose File > Import Movies.
  3. Locate your movie, saved in step 7 above.
  4. Click Import.

Tip: You can also export your presentation from Keynote to other iLife applications by selecting File > Send To… in Keynote.

…more iMovie Tips ?

Plug-Ins

How to Install Additional Plug-Ins:

You can extend iMovie’s features by installing plug-ins. Apple and third parties have created plug-ins for iMovie.

How to install additional plug-ins:

1. Quit iMovie, if it is open.
2. Click the Finder in the Dock.
3. Choose Go to Folder from the Go menu.
4. Type “~/Library” and click Go.
5. If you don’t see a folder named “iMovie” choose New Folder from the File menu, and name it “iMovie”.
6. Open the iMovie folder.
7. If you don’t see a folder named “Plug-ins” choose New Folder from the File menu and name it “Plug-ins”.

The resulting path should look something like this:

  • Macintosh HD/Users/Your User Name/Library/iMovie/Plug-ins/

8. Copy any additional iMovie 2 for Mac OS X plug-ins into the Plug-ins folder.
9. Open iMovie.

The iMovie Plug-in pack 2.1.1 for Mac OS X is available from the iMovie Web site (http://www.apple.com/imovie/).

Free iMovie Plugins:

Apple iMovie Plugin Pack:

2.1 – Download

  • This iMovie Plugin Pack 2.1 includes the following new effects, transitions, and titles

Jerry’s Free iMovie Plugins:

1.3 – Download

  • Color Mangler (color controls) UPDATED FOR 1.3!
  • * Eric The Plugin (4:3 to and from 16:9) UPDATED FOR 1.3!
  • * Funky Monkey (solarization)
  • * Monkey Brewster (lithograph and posterization)
  • * Rhesus Pieces (pixelizing, anonymizer)
  • * Sleepy Time (dream mist)
  • * The Matrix (matrix convolutions)
  • * Ye Olde TV (scanlines, etc)

1.0 – Download

  • Auto Saturation (over, negative and automatic saturation)
  • * Blueprint (blueprints and other related color mistakes)
  • * Color Slide (move R,G,B around independantly of eachother)
  • * False Color (turns the image into a color-cycling image)
  • * HV Hold (adjust horiz,vert hold and position)

BKMS Free iMovie Plugins:

Download

  • This pack contains a selection of transitions taken from the Melt Through, Melt Away, Pixelate, and Soft Wipes sets, download the free BKMS iMovie plug-in samples.

Slick Free iMovie Plugins:

Download

  • Slick Sampler includes 9 fully functional plug-ins for iMovie
  • ( works with iMovie 4, 3 and 2).

Keyboard Shortcuts

You can use your keyboard to quickly accomplish many tasks in iMovie. To learn the shortcuts for common commands, refer to the list below.

Getting information:

Open iMovie Help > Command-?
Show project properties > Command-J
Show date, time, and keywords for video frames > Command-Y

Importing and exporting:

Import from camera > Command-I
Export project to a folder > Command-E

Managing projects and events:

Create new project > Command-N
Move project to Trash > Command-Delete key
Play video beginning from frame beneath pointer +
Plays only the selection if pointer is resting within a selection border; plays through if pointer is resting outside of any selection border. > Space bar
Play selection > / (Forward slash)
Play selected event or project from beginning > (Backslash)
Play selected event or project full screen > Command-G
Page setup > Shift-Command-P
Print selected event or project filmstrips > Command-P

Selecting and editing video:

Select entire clip > Command-A
Deselect all clips > Shift-Command-A
Add selected frames to project > E
Cut selected frames > Command-X
Copy selected frames > Command-C
Paste selected frames > Command-V
Paste all adjustments > Shift-Command-V
Paste video adjustments > Option-Command-I
Paste audio adjustments > Option-Command-U
Paste crop > Option-Command-R
Mark selected frames as favorites > F
Unmarked selected frames > U
Reject selected frames (mark for deletion) > R
Reject selected frames (mark for deletion) in source video (events) +
Delete frames from project > Delete key
Trim selection > Command-B
Open trimmer > Command-R
Open Keywords window > K
Remove all keywords from selection > 0 (zero)
Open crop, rotate, Ken Burns effect editor > C
Open Video Adjustments window > V

Working with audio:

Open Music and Sound Effects pane > Command-1
Open Audio Adjustments window > A
Open Voiceover window > O
Turn on or silence audio while skimming video > Command-K
Undo last action > Command-Z
Redo last action > Shift-Command-Z

Editing text:

Show Fonts window > Command-T
Make selected text bold > Shift-Command-B
Make selected text italic > Shift-Command-I
Underline selected text > Shift-Command-U
Add outline to selected text > Shift-Command-O
Make selected text bigger > Command- + (Plus)
Make selected text smaller > Command- – (Minus)
Align text left > Command-{
Align text center > Command-| (Vertical slash)
Align text right > Command-}
Make text lines tighter > Option-Command-Left Arrow key
Make text lines looser > Option-Command-Right Arrow key
Copy selected text > Command-C
Paste text > Command-V
Copy text style > Option-Command-C
Paste text style > Option-Command-V

iMovie window:

Minimize window > Command-M
Open Photos pane > Command-2
Open Titles pane > Command-3
Open Transitions pane > Command-4
Make viewer small > Command-5
Make viewer medium > Command-6
Make viewer large > Command-7

Keyboard shortcuts and shortcut menus:

You can use the keyboard to perform many of the iMovie menu commands and tasks. To see a comprehensive list of keyboard shortcuts, open iMovie and choose Help > Keyboard Shortcuts.

Another way to access relevant commands is to use shortcut menus. These are context-sensitive menus that list most of the commands you might need for working with different items in the iMovie window.

To open a shortcut menu:

  • Press the Control key while you click an item in the iMovie window.
  • A shortcut menu opens, presenting a context-sensitive list of commands you can use on the item you are clicking.

Customize Keyboard Shortcuts for iMovie:

In addition to the built-in keyboard shortcuts that come as part of the default settings for iMovie, you can also create custom shortcuts for any of iMovie’s menu commands (the commands that are listed when you click on a menu, such as the File menu, Edit menu, and so on).

To create a keyboard shortcut for a menu command in iMovie that does not already have one:

  1. Choose the Apple menu by clicking on the Apple symbol at the top left corner of your screen.
  2. In the drop-down menu that appears, select System Preferences. A System Preferences window will appear. Click on Keyboard & Mouse.
  3. The System Preferences window will become a Keyboard & Mouse window. Select the Keyboard Shortcuts tab. Click the + button.
  4. A new window will appear in front of the Keyboard & Mouse window. Click the All Applications drop-down menu and scroll to select iMovie.
  5. In the field next to Menu Title:, type in the exact name of the command for which you want to create a shortcut as it appears in its iMovie menu. If the command contains an ellipsis, type Option+; (semicolon). In the rare case where using Option+; doesn’t work, try typing three periods (without touching the option key).
  6. Click in the Keyboard Shortcut field and press the combination of keys you want to use as your keyboard shortcut. Your keyboard shortcut may include one letter or number key; one of either the Command, Option, or Ctrl keys; and the Shift key.
  7. Click Add.
  8. Quit and then restart iMovie. The shortcut you created will appear next to the command in its menu.

If you try to create a keyboard shortcut that is already in use for another command in iMovie, the new shortcut you tried to create won’t appear in the menu next to its command—it also won’t work. In this case, the easiest thing to do is to try to create the shortcut again but with a different key combination.

Change a Keyboard Shortcut:

You can also change an existing keyboard shortcut if you wish. To do so, follow the same procedure for creating a shortcut, but type in the name of the menu command that you’d like to change and then type in the new key combination that you’d like to use as its keyboard shortcut.

Delete a Keyboard Shortcut:

You can delete a keyboard shortcut that you’ve created by selecting it in the window and then clicking the – button, which is located next to the + button.

Restoring Shortcuts to Original Settings:

If you’ve added or modified many shortcuts in iMovie, the easiest way to delete them may be to restore the original shortcuts. To do this, click the Restore Defaults button.

Publishing

Publishing directly to YouTube:

You can publish your iMovie project directly to the YouTube website. YouTube is an independent website that freely hosts videos by its community members. To post to YouTube, you must have a YouTube account.

To publish to YouTube:

  • Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > YouTube.
  • Choose your account in the Account pop-up menu.
  • If you don’t have a YouTube account, click Add to be guided through the account creation process on the YouTube website.
  • Choose a category from the pop-up menu for the video to be categorized on the YouTube website.
  • Fill in the following fields:
  • Title: The name of your movie.
  • Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  • Tags: Keywords that viewers can use to search for and find your movie.
  • Select the mobile or medium size for your movie.

If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Either size is good for streaming from the YouTube website; the mobile size will be easier to watch for people with slower internet connections.
Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The size of the movie file in megabytes.
  • You can limit who can view the movie by making selecting “Make this movie private.”
  • Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to the YouTube website.
  • After the movie has been uploaded to YouTube, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to YouTube.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends.

To visit your movie’s webpage, click Visit.

To notify your friends of the new movie you’ve published, click “Tell a friend.”

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to YouTube, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Publishing directly to your .Mac Web Gallery:

To share your movies over the Internet, you can publish your iMovie projects directly to your .Mac Web Gallery. After you publish a movie, send its internet address to your friends and family so they can view it.

To publish to your .Mac Web Gallery, you must have an active .Mac account. If you don’t already have a .Mac account, you can sign up for one at the .Mac or MobileMe website.

To publish to your .Mac Web Gallery:

Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > .Mac Web Gallery.

In the “Publish to .Mac” window, fill in the fields:

  • Title: The title of your movie.
  • Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  • Select one or more movie sizes to publish. The dimensions of the finished movies are shown on the right side of the table.
  • Mobile size is recommended for most purposes; the larger sizes may be difficult to watch for people who have slow Internet connections.

If the larger sizes are unavailable, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

  • H.264: The standard video compression used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The file size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Choose an option from the “Viewable by” pop-up menu to set password protection for your movie, depending on whether you want it to be publicly viewable or accessible by only specific people.
  • Everyone: Makes the movie publicly accessible by any visitor to your .Mac Web Gallery.
  • Only me: Requires your .Mac user name and password in order for you to see the movie. Sharing your user name and password with others is not recommended.
  • Edit names and passwords: Allows you to create user names and passwords that you can provide to others whom you want to be able to access the movie. After selecting this option, click the Add (+) button in the bottom-left corner of the window and then type a user name. Press the Tab key, and then type the password you want to associate with the user name. User names and passwords must be between four and twenty characters long and can include only letters (a through z), digits (0 through 9), the underscore (_) or a period (.), but not more than a single period can be used at the end. Any Web Gallery movies available to this user will be listed to the right of the password. Click OK, and then select the user name from the “Viewable by” pop-up menu.
  • Select “Hide movie on Web Gallery homepage” if you do not want the movie to appear on the homepage of your .Mac Web Gallery.
  • Select “Allow movie to be downloaded” if you want viewers to be able to download copies of your movie.
  • Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to your .Mac Web Gallery. After the movie has been uploaded to .Mac, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to .Mac.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends and family.
  • To visit your movie’s webpage, click Visit.
  • To notify your friends and family of the new movie you’ve published, click “Tell a friend.”
  • If you want to remove your movie from .Mac, choose Share > “Remove from .Mac.”

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to .Mac, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. The old version of the movie is deleted and replaced by the new one when you publish it again by choosing Edit > “Republish to .Mac Web Gallery.”

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to a folder in the Finder.

Watching

Watching your movies on Apple TV:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects on your Apple TV, you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. The large size movie is best for viewing on Apple TV.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > “Share Project with iTunes.”
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render. If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render. The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:
  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In iTunes, click Movies to see your movie and broadcast it through Apple TV.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your movies on your iPod:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects on your iPod (or download it to you iPhone), you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. The medium sized movie is best for viewing on your iPod.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > “Share Project with iTunes.”
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render.
  • If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.
  • The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies.
  • H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.
  • fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.
  • Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.
  • MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.
  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In iTunes, click Movies to see your movie and download it to your iPod or iPhone.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your video on your iPhone:

There are two ways to view an iMovie project on your iPhone:

  • Send it to iTunes and download it just as you do for an iPod.
  • Publish it to your .Mac Web Gallery.

To learn how to send a movie to iTunes for downloading to your iPhone, see the instructions for watching your movie on your iPod.

Watching your movies on your iPod:

To publish to .Mac, you must have an active .Mac account. If you don’t already have a .Mac account, you can sign up for one at the .Mac website.

To publish your video to the .Mac Web Gallery and watch it on your iPhone:

  1. Select your project in the Project Library, and then choose Share > .Mac Web Gallery.
  2. In the Publish to .Mac window, fill in the fields: Page Title: The title of your movie. Description: Some information about your movie for viewers to read.
  3. Select the tiny and mobile sizes to publish. Your iPhone uses either of these sizes, depending on how you’re connected.
  4. Select “Allow movies to be downloaded” if you want viewers to be able to download copies of your movie.
  5. You can limit who can view the movie by selecting “Show project on Web Gallery home page.”
  6. Click Publish. iMovie automatically uploads your movie to your .Mac Web Gallery. After the movie has been uploaded to .Mac, the title bar of your project in iMovie displays “Published to .Mac.” It also displays buttons that take you to the movie’s webpage and send notifications to your friends and family.
  7. To find out the URL (web address) for the movies published to your .Mac Web Gallery, click Visit, and then write down the URL.
  8. Using Safari on your iPhone, navigate to the URL for your movies.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to your .Mac Web Gallery.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve published it to .Mac, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. The old version of the movie is deleted and replaced by new ones when you publish it again by choosing Edit > “Republish to .Mac Web Gallery.”

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Watching your movies in Front Row:

If you want to view one of your iMovie projects in Front Row, you need to send it to iTunes. When you send your project to iTunes, iMovie allows you to create one or more movies of different sizes, depending on the size of the original media that’s in your project. You’ll be able to play any of these sizes in Front Row.

To send your project to iTunes:

  • Select it in the Project Library, and then choose Share > iTunes.
  • Select one or more sizes of movie to render.

If the larger sizes are not available, the original project media isn’t large enough to render in that size. The largest media size used in the project determines the final movie sizes you can render.

The dots below each device in the table of sizes indicate which movie sizes are recommended for use with that device. Hovering the pointer over the “i” next to the movie dimensions displays the following information for the rendered movies:

H.264: The standard video compression that’s used in the movie.

fps: The frame rate of the movie in frames per second.

Kbps: The maximum rate at which the movie can be streamed over the Internet in kilobytes per second.

MB: The files size of the movie in megabytes.

  • Click Publish. Rendering can take up to several minutes depending on the size of your movie and if you’re rendering several sizes at once. After the project has finished rendering, iTunes opens automatically.
  • In Front Row, select Videos, and then select Movies to find the movies you created in iMovie.

In iMovie, an icon appears next to the project’s name in the Project Library to indicate that the project has been rendered. If you select the project in the Project Library, its title bar indicates that it’s been sent to iTunes.

If you make further edits to your project in iMovie after you’ve sent it to iTunes, the title bar indicates that your project is out of date and needs to be rendered again. Old versions of the movie are deleted and replaced by new ones when you render it again.

If you want to save the previous version of your movie before you edit it, you can do so by exporting it to the Finder.

Creating

Using iSight with iMovie:

In addition to DV FireWire camera support, iMovie 4 added compatibility with some IIDC-based FireWire video cameras including the external version of the Apple iSight camera.

To use the built-in iSight included with some Macintosh models, use iMovie HD 6 or later.

If your iSight camera is not recognized by iMovie (“no camera is attached” message), make sure you are using the correct version of iMovie. Check also to make sure that other applications which may be using the camera are not open, such as Photo Booth or iChat. iMovie cannot access the iSight camera if it is already in use by another application.

Tip: For best results when capturing from an iSight camera, make sure your subject is well lit.

Built-in iSight camera not recognized:

In iMovie 7.1.2 or later, you may not be able to use your built-in iSight camera to capture footage in iMovie. iMovie may not recognize the camera. This may occur even if you are able to activate the camera in other applications, such as iChat.

Resolution:

If you are experiencing this behavior, follow the steps below:

1. In Finder, navigate to /System/Library/LaunchDaemons

2. Select the file com.apple.mio.VDCAssistant.plist and delete.

3. Restart your system.

You should now be able to use your iSight camera with iMovie.

Adding and removing audio tracks:

In iMovie, you can easily add and remove audio tracks to your project.

1. Open your project in iMovie ’08 and click the Music and Sound Effects button.

The Music and Sound Effects window opens in the lower right corner of your iMovie project window.

2. Select a song from the Music and Sound Effects window, then drag and drop it over the gray space of your project background. The gray background turns green as you drag your song over the background.

You can also specify the exact location (pinning) that you want your audio file to start by dragging it over a video clip (not the background). As you drag your song, a vertical red line indicates where the audio track will begin when you release the mouse button.

Your audio track appears as a green bar under your project’s video clips.

Note: After adding the audio, you can move it within your project by dragging the green audio bar.

The example above describes adding a pinned audio track, but in iMovie ’08 you can add multiple sound tracks like sound effects, background music and voice over recordings.

3. To remove an audio track from your iMovie project, simply select the audio track (the green audio track is then outlined with a yellow line) and press the Delete key and the audio tracked is erased from your project.

4. If you want to remove a song you added to the background, select the green background area to highlight it the song and press the Delete key.

Changing transition times:

You can change the duration of the transitions in your video project, setting how long it takes for one clip to transition fully to the next. Transitions can be no longer than half the length of the shortest adjacent clip.

Follow these steps to change the transition duration:

1. In your iMovie project, select the transition whose duration you want to adjust. When selected, the transition is highlighted by a yellow rectangle. The transition time displays when you move your pointer over it. In this example the transition duration is 0.5 seconds.

2. rom the Edit menu, choose Set Duration.

3. When the Set Duration window opens, the current transition time is displayed in the Duration field. Type in the new duration and select the option to apply the duration to the selected transition or apply to all transitions in your project.

Click OK.

4. Move your pointer over the transition to see the new duration. In this example, it was increased from .5s to 1.0s.

Note: If you added transitions to your project using the automatic transition feature, you can’t change them individually.